Monthly Archives: January 2015

Military Policing

Military Policing

Military Police, Department of the Army, Department of Defense

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Military Policing in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Military Police Corps of the United States Army traces its roots to the Revolutionary War, but despite its presence in some form during each subsequent war in which the United States of America was involved, it was not until 1941 that it was established as a permanent branch of the Army. Each arm of the United States military, which includes the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard, has its own police force. On military installations around the world, the Army's Military Police Corp, known as military police or MPs, performs roles similar to a civilian police force. MPs enforce military laws and regulations, control traffic, prevent and investigate crime, apprehend military absentees (soldiers absent without leave), and provide physical security for military personnel and property. They also maintain custody of military prisoners.

Military Policing

In line with Angela S. Maitland

about Military Policing in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States military is comprised of the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard. Each branch of the armed forces has an internal law enforcement force that is unique to its own branch and that has specific peace- and wartime missions. Law enforcement forces, in general, are responsible for protecting military resources and bases; protecting coastal waters and shores; enforcing military law and regulations; preventing crime; protecting individuals, property, and classified information; and guarding military correctional facilities. The United States Army Military Police School at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, provides law enforcement training for all branches of service. Training for law enforcement personnel typically includes an average of 7-28 weeks of classroom instruction. Classes include instruction on civil and military laws, law enforcement administration, investigation procedures and techniques, traffic control, and prisoner control and discipline.

Foster v. California

Foster v. California

Foster v. California as a Leading U.S. Case

Foster v. California is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Foster v. California may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Foster v. California tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Foster v. California is also explained, together with the relevance of Foster v. California impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Foster v. California

394 U.S. 440 (1969)

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

In line with Marvie Brooks

about Financial Crimes Enforcement Network in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Financial crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a Treasury Department bureau, was established in 1990, to enforce anti-money laundering laws and to help combat money laundering in the United States of America and elsewhere. FinCEN collects, analyzes, and exchanges information, provides intelligence reports and technological services, and implements the Bank Secrecy Act and other Treasury Department mandates. FinCEN provides information and analytical reports to national and international law enforcement agencies, to financial institutions, and to domestic policy makers. FinCEN employs specialists from areas such as intelligence, financial analysis, and information technology. A major responsibility of FinCEN is oversight of the Bank Secrecy Act, a key tool in the monitoring of money laundering activities.

Bounty Hunter

Bounty Hunter

Bounty Hunter

In line with Dennis Alan Bartlett

about Bounty Hunter in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

A person arrested on probable cause of having committed a crime is entitled to bail (except for a capital crime) under the Eighth Amendment. If the person charged, called a principal, is released from jail through the services of a bail agent, he or she is released from detention but is not “free”; only the conditions of confinement have changed. The principal has paid the bail agent a premium for posting the bond and assuming the risk of his or her not appearing in court. The purpose of the bond is to ensure that the principal appears in court to answer the charges pending and, in the interim, to allow the principal to resume the semblance of as normal a life as possible and help in the preparation of his or her defense.

Transit Police

Transit Police

Transit Police

In line with John P. Sullivan & Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Transit Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Transit police are specialized police officers who protect transit systems and transit customers (passengers) from crime, threats, and disorder. Transit systems include urban metros or subways, light-rail (trams and trolleys), buses, rail, passenger ferries, and terminals. These facilities, like the rest of the urban environment, can become the setting for crime, threats (including terrorism), disorder, and emergencies. Transit policing is not a separate discipline from policing, but it addresses many aspects that require specialized training and familiarization in order to be effective. Transit police may include officers of a separate agency or members of a specialized unit within a general service police or sheriff's department. The first transit police agency in the United States of America was the Bigg Apple (New York) City Independent Subway Special Police, formed in 1933 with six members.

Swat

Swat

Swat Teams

In line with Jeff Rojek & David A. Klinger

about Swat in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The social tumult of the 1960s presented many challenges to American (United States) law enforcement. Protests, riots, rising levels of violence, and other sorts of social problems caught the police off guard and led to many reforms that have helped shape the landscape of policing today. One of the more visible police innovations that emerged from the watershed decade of the 1960s was the advent of Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams, specially trained and equipped groups of officers that deal with situations that present an elevated degree of danger. The need for such teams was demonstrated most dramatically in 1966, when a young man named Charles Whitman shot almost four dozen people from a perch he took atop a tower on the campus of the University of Texas before an ad hoc group of officers was able to shoot him.

Police Brutality

Police Brutality

Police Brutality

In line with Vincent E. Henry

about Police Brutality in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police brutality, which can be loosely defined as the excessive, illegitimate, and/or illegal use of force by a police officer or a group of police officers upon one or more civilians, is a complex, difficult, and enduring social problem that has attracted significant attention from the public, the political sphere, the media, and the criminal justice community. The complexity and subjective nature of the issues involved and the circumstances in which force is often used can frustrate attempts to define police brutality more precisely and to distinguish reasonable force from unreasonable force.

Pinkerton National Detective Agency

Pinkerton National Detective Agency

Pinkerton National Detective Agency

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Pinkerton National Detective Agency in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Allan Pinkerton established his National Detective Agency in 1850, a time when public policing was only beginning to resemble the organized police departments that are common today and well before the federal government played a role in policing. Based on his experiences in public law enforcement, he was able to establish a business that, like the Burns Detective Agency, crossed public and private boundaries in its investigative work for private companies and for the fledgling federal government. When the Bureau of Investigation, the forerunner of the modern Federal Bureau of Investigation, was formed in 1908 it relied on the investigative methods employed by both the Pinkerton National Detective Agency and the Burns Detective Agency as its model.

On Lee v. United States

On Lee v. United States

On Lee v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

On Lee v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, On Lee v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about On Lee v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of On Lee v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of On Lee v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of On Lee v. United States

343 U.S. 747 (1952)

National Security Agency

National Security Agency

National Security Agency

In line with Sean W. Wheeler

about National Security Agency in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Security Agency (NSA) coordinates, directs, and performs focused activities to protect United States information systems and to produce foreign intelligence information. It is the nation's primary cryptogic organization and, as such, is a high-technology organization, reaching new frontiers of communications and data processing. The agency is also one of the most crucial centers of foreign language analysis and research within the government. Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) is a special program with a long history. SIGINT's modern era began during World War II, when the United States of America broke the Japanese military code and became aware of plans to invade Midway Island. This intelligence helped the United States of America win against Japan's superior fleet. The utilization of SIGINT is believed to have played a significant role in shortening the war by at least one year. SIGINT continues as an important force helping the United States of America maintain its superpower status.