Monthly Archives: March 2015

Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities and Exchange Commission

In line with David Schulz

about Securities and Exchange Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), created by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, consists of five commissioners serving five-year terms, appointed by the president. One of the commissioners is designated chair, and no more than three commissioners can be from the same political party at any given time. The commission's duties include interpreting federal securities law, amending existing rules, proposing new rules to address changing market conditions, and enforcing rules and laws. The day-to-day activities of the SEC are under the supervision of the executive director, who oversees four divisions, 18 offices within those divisions, and approximately 3,100 employees at headquarters in Washington, D.C., and 11 regional and district offices around the country. The SEC's primary mission is to protect the investing public by regulating the securities business and certain financial practices including accounting procedures and the buying and selling of stocks, bonds, and other investment instruments.

Saucier v. Katz

Saucier v. Katz

Saucier v. Katz as a Leading U.S. Case

Saucier v. Katz is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Saucier v. Katz may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Saucier v. Katz tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Saucier v. Katz is also explained, together with the relevance of Saucier v. Katz impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Saucier v. Katz

533 U.S. 194 (2001)

Rank Structure

Rank Structure

Rank Structure

In line with Vincent E. Henry

about Rank Structure in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Since the origins of modern American (United States) municipal policing, police departments have followed an organizational rank structure often referred to as the “military model.” Given the fact that both police and military organizations are characterized by similar operational demands involving issues of chain of command, unity of command, internal discipline, strict accountability, training, the use of force, and the need for effective supervision and leadership, the military model is generally considered an appropriate and viable organizational structure for police agencies.

National Transportation Safety Board

National Transportation Safety Board

National Transportation Safety Board

In line with Frances Sherertz

about National Transportation Safety Board in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent agency of the United States government, charged with the investigation of certain transportation accidents within the United States of America for the sole purpose of issuing safety recommendations to prevent future accidents. The board is not authorized to establish liability for civil purposes, but attempts to prevent future accidents by recommending operational, regulatory, and engineering improvements. The board has neither the authority nor the training to conduct criminal investigations. Where there is a collateral interest on the part of law enforcement, federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies conduct all portions of the criminal investigation. The NTSB's role with law enforcement is solely to make evidence and technical information available to enforcement officials. The NTSB operates under rules established by the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Chapter VIII.

Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al.

Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al.

Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al. as a Leading U.S. Case

Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al. is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al. may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al. tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al. is also explained, together with the relevance of Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al. impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada et al.

542 U.S. 177 (2004)

Hafer v. Melo

Hafer v. Melo

Hafer v. Melo as a Leading U.S. Case

Hafer v. Melo is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Hafer v. Melo may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Hafer v. Melo tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Hafer v. Melo is also explained, together with the relevance of Hafer v. Melo impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Hafer v. Melo

502 U.S. 21 (1991)

Brendlin v. California

Brendlin v. California

Brendlin v. California as a Leading U.S. Case

Brendlin v. California is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Brendlin v. California may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Brendlin v. California tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Brendlin v. California is also explained, together with the relevance of Brendlin v. California impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Brendlin v. California

551 U.S. 1 (2007)

Amber Alert

Amber Alert

Amber Alert

In line with Mara Sullivan

about Amber Alert in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The AMBER Alert is a voluntary partnership between law enforcement agencies, media, and others to distribute an urgent bulletin in the most serious child abduction cases. It was created in 1996 as a response to the kidnapping and murder of a nine-year-old girl, Amber Hagerman, by a stranger in Arlington, Texas. The acronym stands for America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response. The goal of the AMBER plan is to involve the entire community to help assist in the safe return of abducted children by publicizing the abduction. After law enforcement has confirmed a missing child report, an AMBER Alert is sent to media outlets such as radio stations, television stations, cable companies, Internet bulletin boards, and electronic highway billboards. Since its inception, the AMBER Alert has been an important and successful tool in rescuing kidnapped children in the states that voluntarily participate in the program.

Tennessee v. Garner

Tennessee v. Garner

Tennessee v. Garner as a Leading U.S. Case

Tennessee v. Garner is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Tennessee v. Garner may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Tennessee v. Garner tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Tennessee v. Garner is also explained, together with the relevance of Tennessee v. Garner impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Tennessee v. Garner

471 U.S. 1 (1985)