Accountability

Accountability

Accountability

In line with Phyllis P. McDonald

about Accountability in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The development of accountability in American (United States) law enforcement is intertwined with the evolution of individual rights, personal freedoms, and internal and external drives for police professionalism. Webster's defines accountability as “subject to the obligation to report, explain, or justify actions.” Throughout much of history, outside of the United States of America, police have been accountable to the heads of nation-states whether the authority figure was a king (Hammarabi); a monarch (King John of England); or a dictator (Napoleon, Stalin, Hitler). Even in the United States of America, a progressive democracy in world terms, police have answered to local politicians, judges, and legislators, and have not always been concerned with individual rights or ethical operations. The idea that police should be accountable to the citizens they served did not appear in history until the 1980s and 1990s in the United States of America. In the meantime, police agencies have progressed through several iterations of accountability. 1.

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