Army Criminal Investigation

Army Criminal Investigation

Criminal Investigation Command, Department of the Army, Department of Defense

In line with Robyn Diehl Lacks & Brian Kessler Lacks

about Army Criminal Investigation in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC) houses all major United States Army investigative operations. The Criminal Investigation Command (CID) is the major component of the USACIDC and is its primary criminal investigative organization. The creation of USACIDC and CID can be traced back to the mid-1800s with the creation of the Continental Army and the creation of the Office of the Provost Marshal in 1776, followed two years later by the organization of the Provost Corp. This was followed by passage of the Enrollment Act in March 1863, the first draft law, which forced Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to create a police force to enforce the unpopular law and to arrest those who attempted to desert. During the Civil War the newly created Army Police Force only investigated criminal acts based on the Enrollment Act.

Criminal Investigation Division of the Environmental Protection Agency

In line with Lisa Thomas Briggs

about Army Criminal Investigation in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The primary function of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to implement and enforce pollution control laws enacted by Congress. A staff of approximately 150 special field agents assigned to the EPA's Criminal Investigation Division (CID) is responsible for pursuing violators of these laws. CID is essentially the law enforcement and investigative branch of the EPA. Although environmental crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) are defined broadly, they have in common that they endanger human, animal, or plant life through misuse of the overall environment, whether through industrial waste, pollution, or other harmful acts that threaten the land, air, or water supply. About half of all EPA investigations involve violations of toxic waste transportation laws and illegal dumping of hazardous materials. In addition to criminal prosecutions, the EPA also relies on administrative and civil sanctions to curtail violations of federal environmental laws.

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