Arrest

Arrest

Arrest

In line with Edith Linn

about Arrest in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Arrest, the portal to the criminal justice system, occurs when a legal authority deprives a person of liberty in order to force him or her to answer a criminal charge. Most arrests are made by police officers, but peace officers, such as probation or court officers, also make arrests pursuant to their official duties. Under circumscribed conditions, private individuals may make arrests, although this is discouraged by professional law enforcement. The processing of an arrest can vary in length from under an hour to more than a day, depending on police and prosecutorial procedures, case complexity, witness availability, and other contingencies. The formal recording of an arrest, known as booking , consists of noting an arrest time, basic identifying information about the arrestee, and the charges. Usually, this is followed by photographing and fingerprinting the suspect.

Citizen's Arrest

In line with Barbara Goldman Carrel

about Arrest in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The role of the private person in matters of criminal pursuit and arrest has its formal roots in medieval England with the Statutes of Winchester in 1285. Without an officially organized police force, ordinary citizens were obligated to either initiate an arrest themselves upon witnessing a crime, or immediately join a communal hue and cry to pursue and capture a suspected criminal. Because of the advent of professional law enforcement and rising criminality in emerging densely populated urban centers in the 17th and 18th centuries, citizen-initiated arrests and captures were discouraged, and therefore diminished in number. Although 18th-century English common law officially made an arrest by a private person as legitimate as that of a peace officer's, precise regulations for citizen's arrest further limited its scope and application.

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