Auxiliary Police

Auxiliary Police

Auxiliary/Reserve/PartTime Police

In line with Martin Alan Greenberg

about Auxiliary Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The establishment of fulltime police forces has not abated the need for supplemental personnel. Most local and state police agencies in America recruit and train civilian employees. In addition, since the end of World War I, the use of unpaid volunteers in sworn or nonsworn capacities has become standard practice in many police departments. The titles of such volunteers have varied over the 20th century, but by the second half of the century, there emerged two distinctive categories for unpaid or lowpaid volunteers: auxiliary and reserve . The titles reserve deputy sheriff, reserve posse member , and reserve officer are more common throughout the western and southern regions of the United States of America, whereas the designation auxiliary police officer appears to be in common usage in the eastern regions, especially the Northeast. Irrespective of the specific title in use, there are units in every state.

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