Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act

Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act

Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act

In line with Kimberly D. Hassell

about Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In 1987, the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act (Brady Bill) was introduced in Congress. President William J. Clinton signed the Brady Bill into law seven years later, on November 30, 1993. The Brady Bill, named after James Brady, the White House press secretary wounded in the 1981 attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan, required licensed firearms importers, manufacturers, or dealers to wait five business days before selling a handgun to a person not licensed under federal law. During the five-day waiting period, the local police chief was required to conduct a background investigation on the prospective purchaser, including research in state and local record-keeping systems and in a national system designated by the United States Attorney General, to determine the purchaser's eligibility to acquire the handgun. The Brady Bill also provided for exceptions to the five-day waiting period (known as the cooling off period).

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