Category Archives: A

Arizona v. Johnson

Arizona v. Johnson

Arizona v. Johnson as a Leading U.S. Case

Arizona v. Johnson is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Arizona v. Johnson may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Arizona v. Johnson tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Arizona v. Johnson is also explained, together with the relevance of Arizona v. Johnson impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Arizona v. Johnson

555 U.S 323 (2009)

Asis International

Asis International

Asis International (Formerly the American Society for Industrial Security)

In line with Robert D. McCrie

about Asis International in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

At one level or another, security-protection of assets from loss-as a management function has always had a connection with law enforcement. The principal professional group concerned with this problem and issue-ASIS International-has long had substantial membership from former or current law enforcement officers, though current or past law enforcement employment has never been a requirement for membership. Security services as a business activity originated in the United States of America during the mid-19th century. Allen Pinkerton, a former deputy sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, solved vexing counterfeit problems as Chicago's sole detective in 1848. Later he founded a business that conducted investigations of losses to railroads and the United States Post Office. Still later, the firm expanded services to provide armed and unarmed guarding, intelligence gathering services, and executive protection.

Arizona v. Mauro

Arizona v. Mauro

Arizona v. Mauro as a Leading U.S. Case

Arizona v. Mauro is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Arizona v. Mauro may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Arizona v. Mauro tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Arizona v. Mauro is also explained, together with the relevance of Arizona v. Mauro impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Arizona v. Mauro

481 U.S. 520 (1987

Afghanistan

Afghanistan

International

In line with Afghanistan is a landlocked country in Central Asia bordered by Iran, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan. It has a population of 28.7 million people. Colonized by Ghengis Khan, the Ottomans, and eventually the British, Afghanistan became independent in 1919 as a monarchy. The ruling king introduced democratic reforms in 1964; these allowed extremist parties to gain hold and the king was overthrown in a coup in 1973. The Soviet Union invaded in 1979 to support communists after yet another coup, but was forced to withdraw by resistance from various factions including Islamic mujahedeen fighters backed by the United States and other countries. The mujahedeen were not party to peace accords leading to the Soviet withdrawal in 1989, and infighting between them and other warlords continued through the mid-1990s, when the Taliban, an extreme religious movement, took control of most of the country by promising control and order.

about Afghanistan in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Airborne Law Enforcement Association

Airborne Law Enforcement Association

Airborne Law Enforcement Association

In line with Frances Sherertz

about Airborne Law Enforcement Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Airborne Law Enforcement Association (ALEA) is an international, professional organization of pilots, mechanics, aviation technicians, and aircraft and avionics manufacturers either directly employed by law enforcement agencies or providing critical support services to those agencies. Founded in 1968 and formally incorporated in 1970 as a nonprofit educational organization in the United States of America, ALEA has a substantial international component in its membership. In 2003, it had approximately 3,500 individual and corporate members.

Assaults

Assaults

Assaults on the Police

In line with Robert J. Kaminski & David A. Klinger

about Assaults in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Policing is dangerous business. Law enforcement officers are victims of nonfatal assaults more often than workers in any other occupation, and they are murdered at rates second only to taxicab drivers/ chauffeurs. FBI records indicate that during the decade ending in 2001, an average of more than 130 police officers died each year in the line of duty, and this figure does not include the 72 officers who perished from the terrorist attack on September 11,2001. Almost half of the officers who died in recent years lost their lives at the hands of criminals who attacked them. FBI figures for this time frame also show that more than 19,000 other officers were injured in assaults perpetrated by citizens each year, and that just under 41,000 other officers were victims of attacks in which they suffered no injuries.

American Society of Criminology

American Society of Criminology

American Society of Criminology

In line with Heath B. Grant

about American Society of Criminology in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The American (United States) Society of Criminology (ASC) began in 1941 in Berkeley, California, as a meeting of seven police administration professors under the original name of the National Association of College Police Training Officials (NACPTO). Among the founders were August Vollmer and Orlando W. (O. W.) Wilson, two of the earliest police administrators who advocated training and education for all police personnel and who also supported academic research into police practices. Under their leadership, NACPTO focused principally on the enhancement and standardization of police training. Growing quickly from informal gatherings to formal meetings, the association began to attract police trainers from California and neighboring states as well as a number of college professionals.

Asset Forfeiture

Asset Forfeiture

Asset Forfeiture

In line with Paula Gormley

about Asset Forfeiture in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Asset forfeiture is the loss of property, without compensation, due to the commission of a criminal act. Federal forfeiture occurs when federal agents target a property that may have been used to facilitate criminal activity or functions as the proceeds of criminality. Through federal litigation, any interest allocated to the property vests in the United States of America. Agencies maintaining forfeiture programs are United States attorneys' offices, the Drug Enforcement Agency, the United States Customs Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the United States Marshals Service, the United States Postal Inspection Service, the Internal Revenue Service (Criminal Investigation Division), the United States Secret Service, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

State Asset Forfeiture

In line with Paula Gormley

about Asset Forfeiture in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Each state and territory in the United States of America has its own forfeiture statute. Hundreds of statutes exist that are linked to a variety of state crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), including drug offenses. Generally, state statutes apply language and procedures modeled after the provisions of federal forfeiture laws. As with federal forfeiture, state statutes define the conduct giving rise to forfeiture and a state officer's authority to seize property. Similarly, many state statutes provide for judicial, administrative, and summary forfeiture. Most states provide for judicial in rem or in personam proceedings, which are applied to civil and criminal forfeitures, respectively. Civil forfeitures proceed as in rem actions. In rem is a legal proceeding against an asset in which the state forfeits all right, title, and interest in that asset.

Arizona v. Gant

Arizona v. Gant

Arizona v. Gant as a Leading U.S. Case

Arizona v. Gant is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Arizona v. Gant may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Arizona v. Gant tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Arizona v. Gant is also explained, together with the relevance of Arizona v. Gant impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Arizona v. Gant

556 U.S. 332 (2009)

Arizona v. Hicks

Arizona v. Hicks

Arizona v. Hicks as a Leading U.S. Case

Arizona v. Hicks is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Arizona v. Hicks may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Arizona v. Hicks tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Arizona v. Hicks is also explained, together with the relevance of Arizona v. Hicks impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Arizona v. Hicks

480 U.S. 321 (1987)