Category Archives: L

Law Enforcement Memorials

Law Enforcement Memorials

Law Enforcement Memorials

In line with Ronald C. Van Raalte

about Law Enforcement Memorials in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

On April 28, 1854, Phil Audax wrote to the Ohio State Journal regarding the death of Cyrus Beebe, the first Columbus (Ohio) officer killed in the line of duty: Mr. Editor: Mr. Beebe, the murdered policeman … fell nobly doing his duty…. Is there not therefore an obligation now resting upon his fellow citizens? Such firmness and courage as he displayed, if exhibited on a wider field, warring for his country, would have given his name a place in history…. I would suggest therefore that the City Council take measures at once to erect over the remains of the brave executor of the law a suitable monument to commemorate his fidelity and public worth. Although the Columbus Police Department has him listed on their official memorial at headquarters, a monument to Officer Beebe has not been found. Mr.

Law Enforcement Structure

Law Enforcement Structure

Law Enforcement Structure: Centralized/Decentralized

In line with Michael Sadykiewicz

about Law Enforcement Structure in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

There are two main aspects of police force structure to consider when thinking of police centralization or decentralization: 1. Level of subordination, which refers to aspects of the police hierarchy 2. Range of fragmentation of the forces, which refers to the number of agencies performing law enforcement tasks In a police service or force, the superior is the person or institution to which the chief of a given police unit is directly subordinate in operational, personnel (appointments and promotion), and budgetary matters. Other kinds of subordination matters are of secondary importance. A centralized organizational structure system means that the sublocal police units (police stations) are subordinate to the local units; these local units in turn report to the subregional (county) headquarters, and the subregional units report to the regional (state) headquarters.

Lineups

Lineups

Lineups

In line with Steven Penrod

about Lineups in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Nearly everyone is familiar with the standard American (United States) lineup: six individuals (the suspect plus five “foils” or fillers), all of whom are shown (often standing in front of a height chart) to the witness, who views the lineup members from behind a one-way mirror; is given an opportunity to observe each member of the lineup; and is instructed to make an identification, if possible, or reject the lineup. The police officer who assembled the lineup has selected foils who resemble the suspect (often using other police officers or people who are in custody), arranged the presentation (sometimes in consultation with the suspect's defense attorney), and presented the lineup to the witness-sometimes with an admonition that the witness should take his or her time.

Law Enforcement

Law Enforcement

Appropriations and Budgeting for Law Enforcement

In line with Timothy K. Birch

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States government contains a vast number of law enforcement agencies within the executive, legislative, and judiciary branches. Although most people are familiar with the larger agencies, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and some of the newer agencies that have developed through the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), many people are unaware of the many different forms of law enforcement within this one level of government. The layered nature of American (United States) government, combined with the large number of federal law enforcement agencies, makes it virtually impossible to determine with any degree of accuracy the total value of funds spent by the federal government on its various law enforcement services. It is possible, though, to describe the costs associated with a number of the larger, more prominent agencies and those for whom law enforcement is a major cost center.

News Media and Police

In line with Natasha A. Frost

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Only a very small portion of the public has any direct contact with the criminal justice system. Although citizens have more opportunities to interact with the police than they do with other public servants or government employees, they still get most of their information regarding police activity from the media. From the perspective of both the police and the media, police-media relations, although often contentious, are vitally important. The news media are always looking for stories that will capture audience attention and inform residents of events that occur in their locality. Reports of crime often fit that bill. Because the police make good official sources, local crime reporters often develop working relationships with local law enforcement and turn to the police for information on a daily basis. Police departments, for their part, recognize the power of the media and, where possible, use it to their advantage.

Law Enforcement Pursuits

In line with Geoffrey P. Alpert

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

After observing a traffic violation or being alerted to a person or vehicle, a police officer can signal a driver to stop. In a vast majority of the cases, the driver will pull over and the situation will end without further concern. However, on rare occasions, the driver will refuse to stop or will take evasive action and flee. In these situations, a routine traffic stop turns into a dangerous pursuit. When that occurs, the police officer must decide whether or not to continue a chase, recognizing that if a person refuses to stop, the agency's pursuit policy attaches, and the officer must therefore take into account both policy and training before reaching a decision. Accordingly, the officer must balance both the risks and the potential benefits when deciding whether or not a pursuit is necessary.

State and Local

In line with The development of accountability in American law enforcement is intertwined with the evolution of individual rights, personal freedoms, and internal and external drives for police professionalism. Webster's defines accountability as “subject to the obligation to report, explain, or justify actions.” Throughout much of history, outside of the United States, police have been accountable to the heads of nation-states whether the authority figure was a king (Hammarabi); a monarch (King John of England); or a dictator (Napoleon, Stalin, Hitler). Even in the United States, a progressive democracy in world terms, police have answered to local politicians, judges, and legislators, and have not always been concerned with individual rights or ethical operations. The idea that police should be accountable to the citizens they served did not appear in history until the 1980s and 1990s in the United States. In the meantime, police agencies have progressed through several iterations of accountability. 1.

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Law Enforcement Television Network

Law Enforcement Television Network

Law Enforcement Television Network

In line with Denise Zerella

about Law Enforcement Television Network in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Technology has changed the way people accomplish tasks in every area of life, and education is no exception. At one time, correspondence courses provided the primary means for students to learn outside the traditional classroom environment. The term distance education or distance learning is a specific instructional delivery that does not constrain the student to be physically present in the same location as the instructor. Today, audio, video, and computer technologies are more common delivery modes. Distance education can be as simple as a lecture prerecorded on an audio or videotape or as complex as a two-way, real-time audio and video interaction using videoconferencing equipment. For law enforcement agencies working with limited budgets, distance learning represents a cost-effective way to provide the training that their employees might not receive otherwise.