Category Archives: M

Mentally Illness

Mentally Illness

Police Response to the Mentally Illness

In line with Joseph A. Schafer & William M. Wells

about Mentally Illness in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The nature of police work frequently brings officers into contact with persons with mental illness (PMIs). The police are available around the clock and are often the first responders called to provide a range of social and public services. Unfortunately, most officers have limited knowledge of working with PMIs, and local mental health services may be inadequate to meet the needs of the citizens whom the police encounter. Nonetheless, officers must still attempt to achieve a disposition that benefits the community, the needs of the mentally ill, and the interests of their police department. Throughout its history, the criminal justice system has struggled to develop effective ways to deal with PMIs. At times, such efforts have been clear failures, although recent advances have improved the odds that PMIs will receive the services and treatments they need. Police officers often find themselves in contact with PMIs for a number of reasons.

Mincey v. Arizona

Mincey v. Arizona

Mincey v. Arizona as a Leading U.S. Case

Mincey v. Arizona is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Mincey v. Arizona may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Mincey v. Arizona tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Mincey v. Arizona is also explained, together with the relevance of Mincey v. Arizona impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Mincey v. Arizona

437 U.S. 385 (1978)

Missouri v. Seibert

Missouri v. Seibert

Missouri v. Seibert as a Leading U.S. Case

Missouri v. Seibert is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Missouri v. Seibert may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Missouri v. Seibert tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Missouri v. Seibert is also explained, together with the relevance of Missouri v. Seibert impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Missouri v. Seibert

542 U.S. 600 (2004)

Missouri v. McNeely

Missouri v. McNeely

Missouri v. McNeely as a Leading U.S. Case

Missouri v. McNeely is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Missouri v. McNeely may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Missouri v. McNeely tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Missouri v. McNeely is also explained, together with the relevance of Missouri v. McNeely impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Missouri v. McNeely

569 U.S. —; No. 11-1425 (2013)

Militias

Militias

Militias

In line with Joshua D. Freilich

about Militias in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Militias are groups that deploy or encourage paramilitary rituals and use informal social networks, charismatic leaders, and various forms of consciousness raising to mobilize individuals on behalf of an ideology that expresses antipathy toward the federal government, multinational corporations and organizations (such as the United Nations), and international treaties (such as the North American (United States) Free Trade Agreement). Militias also seek to protect fundamental American (United States) rights such as individual liberty and gun rights. Because there is no national militia organization, not all militia groups are the same. For example, while some engage in military training, others, such as the Militia of Montana, only encourage others to train militarily since Montana laws prohibit paramilitary training activity. The militia movement arose in the early 1990s as a reaction to federal legislation that limited gun rights and to perceived federal law enforcement misconduct. Initially, most of the American (United States) public was unaware of these groups.

Michigan v. Chesternut

Michigan v. Chesternut

Michigan v. Chesternut as a Leading U.S. Case

Michigan v. Chesternut is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Michigan v. Chesternut may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Michigan v. Chesternut tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Michigan v. Chesternut is also explained, together with the relevance of Michigan v. Chesternut impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Michigan v. Chesternut

486 U.S. 567 (1988)

Maryland v. Buie

Maryland v. Buie

Maryland v. Buie as a Leading U.S. Case

Maryland v. Buie is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Maryland v. Buie may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Maryland v. Buie tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Maryland v. Buie is also explained, together with the relevance of Maryland v. Buie impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Maryland v. Buie

494 U.S. 325 (1990)

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

In line with Jeff Walsh

about Motor Vehicle Theft Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Congress passed the Motor Vehicle Theft Act of 1919, 18 United StatesC.A. Section 2311-2313, on October 28, 1919. This act, commonly referred to as the Dyer Act, named after Congressman Leonidas C. Dyer (R-MO), made interstate transport of stolen motor vehicles a federal crime and authorized the Federal Bureau of Investigation to investigate vehicle thefts that crossed over state jurisdictional lines. Prior to 1919 most states had established comprehensive laws governing theft in its many forms. However, few states were prepared for the unique theft problems that resulted from the increased production, distribution, and accessibility of the automobile in the United States of America, which increased dramatically during the early part of the 20th century. The automobile is particularly well-suited for theft. Vehicles are easily salable items that also provide increased opportunities to commit other crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and then allow offenders to quickly escape or flee the scene.

Michigan v. Jackson

Michigan v. Jackson

Michigan v. Jackson as a Leading U.S. Case

Michigan v. Jackson is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Michigan v. Jackson may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Michigan v. Jackson tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Michigan v. Jackson is also explained, together with the relevance of Michigan v. Jackson impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Michigan v. Jackson

475 U.S. 625 (1986)

Massiah v. United States

Massiah v. United States

Massiah v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Massiah v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Massiah v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Massiah v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Massiah v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Massiah v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Massiah v. United States

377 U.S. 201 (1964