Category Archives: M

Misdemeanors

Misdemeanors

Misdemeanors

In line with Camille Gibson

about Misdemeanors in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Historically, under English common law, misdemeanors referred to all offenses except treason and felonies. Felonies were offenses requiring some forfeiture of a person's life and/or property. However, unlike felonies and treason, misdemeanor offenses could be further classified as either mala in se (wrong in themselves) or mala prohibita (wrong according to statute, but not wrong in themselves). Today, in the United States of America, misdemeanors remain less serious offenses than felonies, which usually require more than a year of incarceration in a prison or death, and more serious offenses than infractions, otherwise called “violations,” which are punishable by a small fine and carry no right to a trial or the benefit of counsel. The differences among all three are largely a matter of the sanctions involved.

Messerschmidt v. Millender

Messerschmidt v. Millender

Messerschmidt v. Millender as a Leading U.S. Case

Messerschmidt v. Millender is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Messerschmidt v. Millender may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Messerschmidt v. Millender tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Messerschmidt v. Millender is also explained, together with the relevance of Messerschmidt v. Millender impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Messerschmidt v. Millender

565 U.S. —, No. 10-704 (2012)

McNeil v. Wisconsin

McNeil v. Wisconsin

McNeil v. Wisconsin as a Leading U.S. Case

McNeil v. Wisconsin is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, McNeil v. Wisconsin may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about McNeil v. Wisconsin tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of McNeil v. Wisconsin is also explained, together with the relevance of McNeil v. Wisconsin impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of McNeil v. Wisconsin

501 U.S. 171 (1991)

Mann Act

Mann Act

Mann Act

In line with Nancy Egan

about Mann Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The passing of the White Slave Traffic Act of 1910 (36 Stat. 825), popularly known as the Mann Act, was the federal government's regulatory response to the white slavery hysteria that gripped the country during the early years of the 20th century. The act, which applied the commerce clause of the Constitution to combat prostitution, contained vague language that was broadly interpreted by the Court of last resort of the Country. Its enforcement at times created the potential for blackmail, criminalization of the women it was designed to protect, and abuse of prosecutorial discretion.

Missing Persons

Missing Persons

Missing Persons Investigations

In line with Deborah L. Sawers

about Missing Persons in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Historically, state criminal law (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia here) has prohibited non-familial abduction and kidnapping, and the public has expected swift and aggressive investigation into such cases. The kidnapping and murder of the son of Charles A. Lindbergh in 1932 led to a federal statute, the Federal Kidnapping Act, which allowed United States Department of Justice intervention and prescribed severe penalties for transporting the victims of kidnapping across state or national boundaries. According to the FBI, as of 2003, there were 97,297 active missing persons cases in the United States of America; the majority, 85%-90%, of these missing persons are juveniles. In roughly 725,000 cases, the disappearance of a child or adult was serious enough that it was reported to the police, the police took a report, and entered the report into the FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC).

Minnick v. Mississippi

Minnick v. Mississippi

Minnick v. Mississippi as a Leading U.S. Case

Minnick v. Mississippi is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Minnick v. Mississippi may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Minnick v. Mississippi tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Minnick v. Mississippi is also explained, together with the relevance of Minnick v. Mississippi impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Minnick v. Mississippi

498 U.S. 146 (1990)

Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz

Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz

Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz as a Leading U.S. Case

Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz is also explained, together with the relevance of Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Michigan Department of State Police v. Sitz

496 U.S. 444 (1990)

Mccone Commission

Mccone Commission

The Mccone Commission

In line with Anders Walker

about Mccone Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In the late summer of 1965, a predominantly black neighborhood of Los Angeles known as Watts descended into 6 days of massive rioting. California Governor Edmund “Pat” Brown, reeling from the political impact of the unrest, tapped John A. McCone, former director of the CIA and a well-known conservative, to conduct an impartial study of the unrest. McCone proceeded to lead a commission-the McCone Commission, which was made up of six whites and two African Americans, as well as a support staff of 29 assistants, 16 clerks and secretaries, and 26 consultants-through a series of hearings, interviews, and studies. This process was designed to provide descriptive and chronological information about the riots as well as to give recommendations to prevent their recurrence.

Murray v. United States

Murray v. United States

Murray v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Murray v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Murray v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Murray v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Murray v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Murray v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Murray v. United States

487 U.S. 533 (1988)

Maryland v. Wilson

Maryland v. Wilson

Maryland v. Wilson as a Leading U.S. Case

Maryland v. Wilson is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Maryland v. Wilson may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Maryland v. Wilson tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Maryland v. Wilson is also explained, together with the relevance of Maryland v. Wilson impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Maryland v. Wilson

519 U.S. 408 (1997)