Category Archives: N

Narcotics Control Act

Narcotics Control Act

Narcotics Control Act

In line with Dryden Watner

about Narcotics Control Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Narcotics Control Act (NCA) of 1956 was proposed in order to help eradicate the use and trafficking of narcotic drugs and marijuana. At the time of its proposal, the government estimated that 60,000, or 1 in 3,000, people were addicted to drugs and that approximately $219 million was spent annually for drugs obtained through illegal sources. Prior to the passing of the Narcotics Control Act, the Boggs Act, proposed by Senator Hale Boggs (D-LA) and signed and enacted in 1951, provided minimum mandatory sentences for firsttime drug violators and brought together drug legislation of narcotics and marijuana for the first time. After the Boggs Act was passed, the government reported significant declines in drug arrests in the United States of America.

National Transportation Safety Board

National Transportation Safety Board

National Transportation Safety Board

In line with Frances Sherertz

about National Transportation Safety Board in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent agency of the United States government, charged with the investigation of certain transportation accidents within the United States of America for the sole purpose of issuing safety recommendations to prevent future accidents. The board is not authorized to establish liability for civil purposes, but attempts to prevent future accidents by recommending operational, regulatory, and engineering improvements. The board has neither the authority nor the training to conduct criminal investigations. Where there is a collateral interest on the part of law enforcement, federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies conduct all portions of the criminal investigation. The NTSB's role with law enforcement is solely to make evidence and technical information available to enforcement officials. The NTSB operates under rules established by the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Chapter VIII.

National Sheriffs' Association

National Sheriffs' Association

National Sheriffs' Association

In line with Adam J. McKee

about National Sheriffs' Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Sheriffs' Association (NSA) is a nonprofit professional organization dedicated to increasing professionalism in the criminal justice community. Although there is a decided emphasis on the office of sheriff, the organization is more diverse than its name suggests. Membership is open to the law enforcement community at large as well as concerned citizens and corporate entities. Since its inception in 1940, the NSA has offered many services to the criminal justice community. Today, the organization has grown to approximately 20,000 members, who participate in a wide variety of organizational activities ranging from receiving the monthly Sheriff Magazine to obtaining liability insurance at a reduced rate. The most valuable of these services seems to be the large network of information sharing. Each year a national conference is held in June.

National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives

National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives

National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives

In line with Kimberly D. Hassell

about National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Beginning in the 1960s, the violent crime rate in America began a dramatic proliferation. From the mid-1960s to the late 1970s, the homicide rate doubled, reaching a record peak at 10.2 homicides per 100,000 persons. Further, official data indicated that African Americans were disproportionately represented in violent crime, especially as homicide offenders. Not only were African Americans more likely to commit homicide, but African American (United States) men were also disproportionately represented as homicide victims. At the same time, studies were demonstrating that certain social and structural characteristics in which many African Americans found themselves (such as being unemployed and heading single-parent households) were influencing criminal offending. In September 1976, the Police Foundation and the Department of Justice's Law Enforcement Assistance Administration cosponsored a symposium to address the burgeoning crime problem in urban low-income areas.

National Crime Victimization Survey

National Crime Victimization Survey

National Crime Victimization Survey

In line with Andrew Karmen

about National Crime Victimization Survey in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Victimization surveys yield estimates of how many individuals and households are touched by crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) of violence and theft each year, and of the extent and seriousness of the financial losses and physical injuries these people experience. An International Crime Victims Survey has been translated into many languages and is being administered in countries across the globe. In the United States of America in 1966, the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice commissioned the first large-scale survey about criminal victimization because of scientific skepticism about the accuracy of crime statistics maintained by law enforcement agencies and forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for compilation in its annual nationwide Uniform Crime Report (UCR).

National Crime Victimization Survey

In line with Donald Faggiani

about National Crime Victimization Survey in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Crime Survey (NCS) was introduced by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS; part of the Department of Justice) in 1973. In 1993, BJS implemented a major methodological redesign of the NCS and revised the name to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to reflect the intent of the survey. Until the introduction of the NCS the primary source of crime information in the United States of America was the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), a summary-based reporting system of crime reported directly to the police. The NCS/NCVS was designed to serve as a complement to the UCR by providing additional information on many of the same offenses reported through the UCR. However, the NCS/NCVS provided additional benefits not available through the summary-type reports of the UCR. The NCS/NCVS collects previously unavailable information on crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) suffered by individuals and households, the victims of these crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), and the offenders who perpetrate these offenses.

National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives

National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives

National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE) was formed in early 1995 by a small group of women holding senior management ranks in police agencies throughout the United States of America. It was incorporated as a nonprofit organization less than a year later, in March 1996, with an initial membership of about 150 women. The women represented a variety of types of police agencies, including federal, state, county, municipal, campus, and railroad law enforcement agencies. At its first conference in July 1996, Alana Ennis, then the chief of the Duke University Police Department, Durham, North Carolina, and a founding member of the group, was elected the first president. In 2002, during her term as president, Theresa Chambers became the first female chief of the United States National Park Police and the first chief to have been selected from outside the National Park Service.

National Gallery of Art

National Gallery of Art

Office of Protective Services of the National Gallery of Art

In line with Camille Gibson

about National Gallery of Art in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Office of Protective Services is a primarily uniformed force of almost 200 officers who provide security services at the National Gallery of Art, a federally administered art gallery that was established in March 1941 and has since grown to two buildings and an outdoor sculpture garden. The facilities, located in downtown Washington, D.C., are open 363 days a year and are free to the public, but entry points are staffed by members of the protective services staff. Officers, who are federal employees and must be United States

New York v. Quarles

New York v. Quarles

New York v. Quarles as a Leading U.S. Case

New York v. Quarles is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, New York v. Quarles may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about New York v. Quarles tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of New York v. Quarles is also explained, together with the relevance of New York v. Quarles impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of New York v. Quarles

467 U.S. 649 (1984)

National Native American Law Enforcement Association

National Native American Law Enforcement Association

National Native American Law Enforcement Association

In line with Jannette O. Domingo

about National Native American Law Enforcement Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Native American (United States) Law Enforcement Association (NNALEA) was founded in Washington, D.C., in 1993. The founders were Native American (United States) men and women from law enforcement organizations across the United States of America where, except for tribal and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) law enforcement agencies, they typically comprised fewer than 1% of agency personnel. NNALEA is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with chapters in New Mexico and Oklahoma. Membership includes Native American (United States) and nonNative American (United States) men and women who are sworn federal, state, local, or tribal law enforcement officers and local chiefs of police, as well as nonlaw enforcement officers. Executive officers must be Native American (United States) sworn law enforcement officers. By mid-2003 NNALEA estimated its membership at more than 700. NNALEA sponsors an annual training conference and publishes a quarterly newsletter.

Naval Criminal Investigative Service

Naval Criminal Investigative Service

Naval Criminal Investigative Service

In line with Paula Gormley

about Naval Criminal Investigative Service in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) is the investigative arm of the Department of the Navy. The NCIS is responsible for investigating crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) committed on navy or marine corps installations (e.g., ships, naval bases) or by navy personnel or their spouses or dependents. The NCIS further provides security for naval officials and naval properties. The NCIS employs approximately 2,300 people, about half of whom are civilian special agents. NCIS personnel can be found in more than 140 locations around the world. The NCIS began in 1915 when the Office of Naval Intelligence was given the responsibility of investigating espionage. After World War II, the Office of Naval Intelligence changed to a predominantly civilian force and its responsibilities were expanded to include conducting criminal investigations, counter-intelligence investigations, and background security investigations of naval personnel.