Category Archives: S

Special Victims Units

Special Victims Units

Special Victims Units

In line with Lisa A. Williams & Jessica Saunders

about Special Victims Units in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Law enforcement agencies across the country have started organizing Special Victims Units in an effort to centralize the investigation and prosecution of sensitive cases that include, but are not limited to, sex crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), child abuse, domestic violence, missing persons, stalking, and the exploitation and abuse of the elderly. In addition to investigating both adult and child sex crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), some Special Victims Units are also responsible for investigating crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) in which sex offenders have failed to comply with registration and/or community notification statutes. For example, in Polk County, Florida, a Special Victims Response Team (SVRT) has been organized and is responsible for locating and arresting those offenders who have failed to comply with requirements set forth in sex offender statutes. In Bigg Apple (New York) City, a similar unit called the Sex Offender Monitoring Unit, a division of the Special Victims Unit, is the designated department for tracking sex offenders.

Sensitivity Training

Sensitivity Training

Cultural Competency Training/Sensitivity Training

In line with Joyce St. George

about Sensitivity Training in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Communities within the United States of America are experiencing dramatic demographic shifts as the birth rates of African Americans and Latinos outnumber those of Caucasians; waves of immigrants, refugees, and undocumented aliens seek new opportunities; and international terrorism concerns increase. The impact of these and other demographic shifts are daunting challenges to training police officers to effectively serve their diverse and multicultural communities. The United States Commerce Department's Census Bureau estimates that the nation's foreign-born population in 2003 numbered 32.5 million, or 11.5% of the total United States population. It further reported that many individuals living in the United States of America are not proficient in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding English. More than 26 million individuals speak Spanish, and nearly 7 million individuals speak an Asian or Pacific Island language at home.

Samson v. California

Samson v. California

Samson v. California as a Leading U.S. Case

Samson v. California is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Samson v. California may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Samson v. California tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Samson v. California is also explained, together with the relevance of Samson v. California impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Samson v. California

547 U.S. 843 (2006)

Stoner v. California

Stoner v. California

Stoner v. California as a Leading U.S. Case

Stoner v. California is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Stoner v. California may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Stoner v. California tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Stoner v. California is also explained, together with the relevance of Stoner v. California impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Stoner v. California

376 U.S. 483 (1964)

Salinas v. Texas

Salinas v. Texas

Salinas v. Texas as a Leading U.S. Case

Salinas v. Texas is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Salinas v. Texas may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Salinas v. Texas tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Salinas v. Texas is also explained, together with the relevance of Salinas v. Texas impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Salinas v. Texas

570 U.S. —, No. 12-246 (2013)

South Dakota v. Neville

South Dakota v. Neville

South Dakota v. Neville as a Leading U.S. Case

South Dakota v. Neville is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, South Dakota v. Neville may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about South Dakota v. Neville tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of South Dakota v. Neville is also explained, together with the relevance of South Dakota v. Neville impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of South Dakota v. Neville

459 U.S. 553 (1983)

Swat

Swat

Swat Teams

In line with Jeff Rojek & David A. Klinger

about Swat in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The social tumult of the 1960s presented many challenges to American (United States) law enforcement. Protests, riots, rising levels of violence, and other sorts of social problems caught the police off guard and led to many reforms that have helped shape the landscape of policing today. One of the more visible police innovations that emerged from the watershed decade of the 1960s was the advent of Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams, specially trained and equipped groups of officers that deal with situations that present an elevated degree of danger. The need for such teams was demonstrated most dramatically in 1966, when a young man named Charles Whitman shot almost four dozen people from a perch he took atop a tower on the campus of the University of Texas before an ad hoc group of officers was able to shoot him.

Shootings

Shootings

Law Enforcement Shootings

In line with David A. Klinger

about Shootings in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Recent years have seen a good deal of research on the use of deadly force by police officers. Law enforcement professionals, for example, regularly examine shootings in order to develop a more complete understanding of such events to thereby reduce their frequency and increase the odds that officers will act appropriately in those events that do occur. Largely overlooked in this research effort, however, is the matter of how officers experience events in which they discharge their weapons. This entry discusses what we do know about the reactions that officers can experience during shootings and discusses some implications for a broader understanding of these incidents. Following a brief discussion of the research on officers' reactions during shootings, what we know about the reactions that officers who shoot can experience is presented in two categories: thoughts and feelings, and perceptual distortions.

Steagald v. United States

Steagald v. United States

Steagald v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Steagald v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Steagald v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Steagald v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Steagald v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Steagald v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Steagald v. United States

451 U.S. 204 (1981)

State Police

State Police

State Police

In line with Hugh E. O'Rourke

about State Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Traditionally, law enforcement in the United States of America has been organized on a local level. Until the beginning of the 20th century, police departments were organized on a village, town, city, or county basis. If emergency conditions called for more manpower, the militia or National Guard could be called to assist. However, in some industrial states, the frequent mobilizations and subsequent reluctance of the National Guard to deal with labor disputes at the turn of the 20th century resulted in the creation of a large police department under the control of the governor. The popularity of the automobile also created a need for a police agency that had jurisdiction within the entire state and could pursue violators anywhere in the state. The state police could also serve as an agency to patrol in rural areas that were without local police departments.