Category Archives: T

Transportation Security Administration

Transportation Security Administration

Transportation Security Administration

In line with Marvie Brooks

about Transportation Security Administration in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA), signed into law by President George W. Bush on November 19, 200l (Pub. L. No. 107-01), established the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) within the Department of Transportation. The TSA, the creation of which was a direct result of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent demands for a higher level of security at domestic airports, is responsible for securing the movement of people and commerce in all modes of transportation-aviation, maritime, and land-as well as for leading research and development into security technology to aid in safeguarding the nation's transportation facilities and infrastructure. In March 2003, the TSA was moved to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as part of the Border and Security Directorate, which was intended to integrate into one agency all government operations for securing United States borders and transportation systems.

Tennessee v. Garner

Tennessee v. Garner

Tennessee v. Garner as a Leading U.S. Case

Tennessee v. Garner is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Tennessee v. Garner may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Tennessee v. Garner tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Tennessee v. Garner is also explained, together with the relevance of Tennessee v. Garner impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Tennessee v. Garner

471 U.S. 1 (1985)

Terrorist Groups

Terrorist Groups

Domestic Terrorist Groups

In line with Steven Chermak & Jeff Gruenewald

about Terrorist Groups in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Public concern about international terrorism changed dramatically after al Qaeda successfully attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Although it was the most significant mass casualty terror attack in the history of the United States of America, it was not the first. As recently as 9 years ago, Timothy McVeigh, a right-wing extremist who has been called the American (United States) Terrorist (Michel & Herbeck, 2001), destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, killing 168 people and injuring many more. This attack, like the September 11, 2001, attacks, shocked the public and changed people's concerns about terrorism. In order to understand terrorism and the threat of terror, it is important to consider both international and domestic threats. This entry focuses on the latter. This discussion serves as an overview of domestic terrorism in America.

Foreign Terrorist Groups

In line with Adam Dulin

about Terrorist Groups in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The term terrorism is rooted in the French Revolution during Maximilien Robespierre's reign of terror, a period when potential enemies of the government were ruthlessly exterminated. Terrorism itself is much older than the origins of the term. For example, the Assassins, a group related to mainstream Shiite Muslims in Iran, committed acts of terrorism more than 1,000 years ago. Likewise, the Thugs of India terrorized travelers in ritualistic fashion for more than three centuries. There is no single accepted definition of what constitutes terrorism. More than 100 definitions have been offered by academe and law enforcement agencies through decades of research. The pejorative nature of the term, as well as the politics involved in designating an act of violence as terrorism, contribute to the difficulty in developing a single definition.

Television

Television

Police Shows in Television

In line with Pamela Donovan

about Television in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The television police show is a crucial, or even sole, source of information about policing for large numbers of citizens. Many citizens have limited contact with the police and thus develop their ideas about police work and crime from television. Police work, as represented in television drama, has consistently differed from the views in film, books, and television crime news. Film noir and detective novels from the 1930s onward depicted a morally corrupt world in which police officers operated. This is a contrast to Dragnet (1951-1959 and 1967-1970), the first series developed in the “police procedural” format. The procedural has served as a basic model for the police series up through the present.

Texas v. Brown

Texas v. Brown

Texas v. Brown as a Leading U.S. Case

Texas v. Brown is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Texas v. Brown may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Texas v. Brown tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Texas v. Brown is also explained, together with the relevance of Texas v. Brown impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Texas v. Brown

460 U.S. 730 (1983)

Terrorism

Terrorism

Police and Terrorism

In line with Heath B. Grant

about Terrorism in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Terrorism is not a new phenomenon to the world; however, following the tragic events of September 11, 2001, many people both domestically and internationally struggled with the search for answers to how this was able to happen. In its wake, law enforcement has been forced to reexamine its role in society as new questions surface related to the balance between public safety and security, the extent of collaboration with federal jurisdictions, the ability to mobilize community support for information-gathering and intelligence activities, and how to develop sufficient resources for both the detection of incidents and response to those that occur. Although the magnitude of the September 11 attacks created a sense of urgency and priority, the need for strategies and tactics to thwart terrorist attacks is not new to law enforcement officials.

Task Forces

Task Forces

Task Forces

In line with Tyrone Russell Morrow

about Task Forces in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The law enforcement multijurisdictional task force can be a very effective tool in investigation, arresting and prosecuting individuals involved in certain kinds of criminal activity. The task force configuration varies depending on the nature and the scope of the crime that it is created to investigate. Task forces fall into two broad categories: local and federal. Typically, the local task force consists of, but is not limited to, representation from local law enforcement agencies, which may include municipal, county, city, and state police departments. It may also consist of local prosecuting attorneys' offices, probation and parole offices, and sheriffs' departments. The federal task force typically includes the above-referenced entities but may also include federal law enforcement agencies such as the United States

Traffic Enforcement

Traffic Enforcement

Traffic Enforcement

In line with Michelle R. Hecht

about Traffic Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

There are three primary purposes for every traffic stop: to stop a violation of the law for public safety, to serve as a general deterrent to other drivers, and to change the driver's future driving behavior. There are numerous benefits of traffic safety units, such as the ability to lower crime rates; increased safety on the roadways; monetary savings in lower insurance, health care, and tax costs; revenue generation; and gains from asset forfeitures. Additionally, traffic law enforcement is a time-proven method of increasing pedestrian safety; increasing seat belt, child safety seat, and helmet use; reducing incidences of impaired and aggressive driving; and increasing the apprehension of dangerous criminals. Law enforcement officers are trained in every aspect of their jobs, for which agencies have developed standard policies and procedures. Conducting professional traffic stops is no different from any other aspect of the law enforcement profession.

Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration

Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration

Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration

In line with Yi Sheng

about Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) is an independent office of inspector general within the Department of the Treasury. TIGTA focuses on tax administration and exercises all duties and responsibilities on matters relating to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). TIGTA is under the supervision of the secretary of treasury, with certain additional responsibilities left to the IRS Oversight Board and Congress. TIGTA was established in January 1999, in accordance with the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended (Section 2 and Section 8D), and the Internal Revenue Service Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 signed by President William J. Clinton on July 22, 1998. The act made structural changes in the management and oversight of IRS activities, with the intent of achieving a more efficient and responsive IRS. Sections 1102(a) and 1103 of the act explain the establishment of a new, independent TIGTA.

Trade Unions

Trade Unions

Trade Unions

In line with Joseph F. King

about Trade Unions in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Trade unions are defined by Webster's Dictionary as an “association of wage earners to further or maintain their rights and interests through collective bargaining with their employer.” Various attempts have been made at organizing police officers into such an association (i.e., welfare or benevolent associations) since the latter part of the 19th century. In the United States of America, these attempts have been restricted to the thousands of local jurisdictions and usually regard matters of employment, salary, or discipline. One of the basic problems for police officers in their attempts to combine their voices to improve their condition has been their position as “guardians of the peace” and “protectors of society.” In the 20th century, police officers have seen their fellow workers improve their lot by bettering their working conditions and salaries through unionization.