Category Archives: T

Trade Unions

Trade Unions

Trade Unions

In line with Joseph F. King

about Trade Unions in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Trade unions are defined by Webster's Dictionary as an “association of wage earners to further or maintain their rights and interests through collective bargaining with their employer.” Various attempts have been made at organizing police officers into such an association (i.e., welfare or benevolent associations) since the latter part of the 19th century. In the United States of America, these attempts have been restricted to the thousands of local jurisdictions and usually regard matters of employment, salary, or discipline. One of the basic problems for police officers in their attempts to combine their voices to improve their condition has been their position as “guardians of the peace” and “protectors of society.” In the 20th century, police officers have seen their fellow workers improve their lot by bettering their working conditions and salaries through unionization.

Transit Police

Transit Police

Transit Police

In line with John P. Sullivan & Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Transit Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Transit police are specialized police officers who protect transit systems and transit customers (passengers) from crime, threats, and disorder. Transit systems include urban metros or subways, light-rail (trams and trolleys), buses, rail, passenger ferries, and terminals. These facilities, like the rest of the urban environment, can become the setting for crime, threats (including terrorism), disorder, and emergencies. Transit policing is not a separate discipline from policing, but it addresses many aspects that require specialized training and familiarization in order to be effective. Transit police may include officers of a separate agency or members of a specialized unit within a general service police or sheriff's department. The first transit police agency in the United States of America was the Bigg Apple (New York) City Independent Subway Special Police, formed in 1933 with six members.

Truancy

Truancy

Truancy

In line with Edith Linn

about Truancy in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Truancy, or unexcused absence from school, is a major problem among American (United States) youth. Many cities report daily truancies numbering in the thousands, and some report absence rates as high as 30%. No national data on truancy rates are available, in part because no uniform definition of truancy exists, but in a 1998 report, public school principals nationwide identified student absenteeism, cutting class, and tardiness as their primary disciplinary problems. Truants are more prone to teen pregnancy; drug abuse; gang membership; and crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) committed during school hours, such as burglary, auto theft, and vandalism. Truants frequently drop out of school, and in adulthood, they have greater difficulty earning an adequate income, raising children, and keeping within the bounds of the law. Society pays other costs as well, such as the loss of attendance-based federal and state funds, and the expense to businesses of training an undereducated, unprepared workforce.

Tennessee Valley Authority Police

Tennessee Valley Authority Police

Tennessee Valley Authority Police

In line with Aviva Twersky-Glasner

about Tennessee Valley Authority Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Tennessee Valley Authority Police (TVAP) is a federally commissioned, internationally accredited law enforcement agency that provides protection for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) properties and employees as well as the 100 million annual users of TVA recreation facilities. The TVA is the largest public power company in the United States of America, with 30,365 megawatts of dependable generating capacity. TVA's power facilities include 11 fossil plants, 29 hydroelectric dams, three nuclear plants, a pumped-storage facility, and 17,000 miles of transmission lines. Through 158 locally owned distributors, TVA provides power to nearly 8.3 million residents in the Tennessee Valley. TVA also manages the Tennessee River, the nation's fifth-largest river, to control floods, make rivers easier to travel, provide recreation, and keep the water clean. Since 1933, the Tennessee Valley Authority has employed public safety officers who have law enforcement responsibilities.

Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales

Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales

Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales as a Leading U.S. Case

Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales is also explained, together with the relevance of Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Town of Castle Rock v. Gonzales

545 U.S. 748 (2005)

Thornton v. United States

Thornton v. United States

Thornton v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Thornton v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Thornton v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Thornton v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Thornton v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Thornton v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Thornton v. United States

541 U.S. 615 (2004)