Children's Online Privacy Protection Act

Children's Online Privacy Protection Act

Children's Online Privacy Protection Act

In line with Dryden Watner

about Children's Online Privacy Protection Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In July 1998, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA) was introduced by Senators Richard H. Bryan (R-NV) and John McCain (R-AZ). The act was proposed in response to a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) report that found that Web sites targeted at children were collecting personal information without any safeguards. The FTC was concerned that collection of personal information from children without parental consent would be an unfair and deceptive trade practice. COPPA was passed within months of its introduction and took effect on April 21, 2000. COPPA requires that commercial Web site operators who have knowledge that they are dealing with a child aged 12 or under, or who aim their content at children, obtain verifiable parental consent before collecting any personal information from a child. A child's personal information may include his or her full name, home address, e-mail address, telephone number, and Social Security number.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.