Community Policing

Community Policing

Community Policing

In line with Wesley G. Skogan

about Community Policing in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Community policing may be the most important development in policing in the past quarter century. Across the country, police chiefs report that they are moving toward this new model of policing, which supplements traditional crime fighting with prob-lem-solving and prevention-oriented approaches that emphasize the role of the public in helping set police priorities. What police departments are doing when they do community policing varies a great deal. Agencies point to a long list of projects as evidence that they are involved. These range from bike and foot patrols to drug awareness programs in schools, home security inspections, storefront offices, and citizen advisory committees. In some places, community policing is in the hands of special neighborhood officers, whereas in other places, it involves the transformation of the entire police department.

Community Policing: A Caribbean Case

In line with Keith Carrington

about Community Policing in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Many police departments have become victims of the “means over ends” syndrome because the administration focused primarily on organization and operations while paying little attention to their overall performance (Goldstein, 2002). Such internal emphasis prevents the police from dealing effectively with crime and disorder. In the Caribbean, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service's (TTPS) shift to community policing in 1991 in many ways represents the many countries in the Caribbean that have adopted a community policing approach. The experience of Trinidad and Tobago shows how the administration reacted to concerns about the organization's handling of crime and other social problems. Community policing was introduced to complement the service's traditional approach to policing. The strategy was expected to change the organization's reactive approach to crime fighting, which excluded community input, to a proactive approach with community involvement.

International Community Policing

In line with Mitch Librett & Rainer Kroll

about Community Policing in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Community policing is essentially a conceptual frame for a new paradigm of policing that was developed in academic circles in the United States of America. The tumultuous events of the 1960s, including mass civil disorder and rising crime rates, prompted political effort to reevaluate police's effectiveness as an institution. Media coverage of overly reactive and forceful police response to apparently peaceful civil rights demonstrations and violent disorder in some of the largest cities resulted in widespread public perception of the police as a violent and ineffectual institution. Worse, there was little confidence that policing was capable of suppressing the upsurge in violent, interpersonal crime that seemed to accompany the vivid scenarios viewed nightly on the national news.

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