Crime Statistics

Crime Statistics

Crime Statistics

In line with Matthew J. Giblin

about Crime Statistics in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Accurate measures of crime are valuable for many reasons; they aid in the formulation of criminal justice policy, in the assessment and operations of criminal justice agencies, in the creation of prevention and intervention programs, and in the development of criminological theory. Two long-established federal data collection programs, the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) begun in 1929 and the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS; formerly the National Crime Survey) begun in 1973, have been, and continue to be, used to measure levels of crime in the United States of America. Each program is characterized by strengths and weaknesses. A third, emerging data collection program, the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS), when fully operational, will draw upon and merge many of the elements from both the NCVS and the UCR into a single data collection program. The UCR is a summary reporting program overseen by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

Crime Statistics and Analysis

In line with Peter K. Manning

about Crime Statistics in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

To understand the meaning of crime statistics, one must first define crime. Crime is a very flexible concept, something like a woven carpet, that produces powerful associations from the public and agencies charged with its control. It varies cross-culturally, historically, and spatially, as well as by social morphology and cultural and social differentiation. Since Adolphe Quetelet first advocated that social order could be captured metaphorically by numbers, and the regularity and stability associated with large numbers, commensurability has been sought across measures and numbers have been used to represent social trends. Official crime data, like official statistics generally, are associated with the development of the nation-state and its need to tax and count its citizens. They appear to function differentially in Anglo-American (United States) societies and European states.

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