Criminal Investigation

Criminal Investigation

Investigative Techniques

In line with Richard H. Ward

about Criminal Investigation in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Criminal investigation has changed dramatically over the past several decades. with the most important changes relating to advances in science and technology. The development of DNA analysis, firearms identification, single-digit (fingerprint) classification systems, and the application of computer technology to the investigative function bring a new dimension to basic criminal investigation. These have become important tools as a litany of court decisions and other policies have placed greater restrictions on an investigator's use of more traditional methods, such as interviewing, interrogation, and witness identification. Greater emphasis on human rights and past abuses in conducting investigations has resulted in United States Court of last resort of the Country decisions that narrow the arbitrary discretion of the investigator. The days of routinely beating suspects and subjecting them to third-degree interrogation methods or lengthy interviews, as well as illegal wiretaps, searches, and detention of suspects for long periods of time without probable cause, are largely practices of the past.

U.S. Criminal Investigation Command, Department of the Army, Department of Defense

In line with Robyn Diehl Lacks & Brian Kessler Lacks

about Criminal Investigation in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC) houses all major United States Army investigative operations. The Criminal Investigation Command (CID) is the major component of the USACIDC and is its primary criminal investigative organization. The creation of USACIDC and CID can be traced back to the mid-1800s with the creation of the Continental Army and the creation of the Office of the Provost Marshal in 1776, followed two years later by the organization of the Provost Corps. This was followed by passage of the Enrollment Act in March 1863, the first draft law, which forced Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to create a police force to enforce the unpopular law and to arrest those who attempted to desert. During the Civil War the newly created Army Police Force only investigated criminal acts based on the Enrollment Act.

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