Drug Enforcement

Drug Enforcement

Drug Enforcement

In line with Tammy S. Garland

about Drug Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In February 2002, President George W. Bush unveiled a new campaign to target the drug problem within the United States of America. The strategy emphasized supply reduction through aggressive drug enforcement and interdiction programs while simultaneously emphasizing demand reduction through effective drug education, prevention, and treatment programs. Under this plan, the federal government allocated almost $2 billion to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to maintain the War on Drugs. This trend in drug enforcement is not innovative, but is simply a continuation of past policies. Since the establishment of federal agencies designed to combat the use, manufacture, and sale of illegal drugs, the federal government has increasingly appropriated funding to combat the illicit drug trade. In addition, the ever-changing policies have evolved to encompass a number of agencies working simultaneously to eliminate the flow of illicit drugs throughout the country.

Drug Enforcement in the United States

In line with Michael D. Lyman

about Drug Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The enforcement of drug laws represents one of the major components of American (United States) law enforcement. Although drug enforcement has been a function of law enforcement since the early part of the 20th century, it gained considerable momentum in the mid-1970s when drug abuse began to soar and federal money for training, education, and equipment was made available to police agencies to address the problem. Federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies share responsibility for most of the nation's drug enforcement efforts. When these entities combine their efforts, they primarily deal with the supply side of the nation's drug abuse problem. In 1973, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was formed to restrict the supply of controlled substances through coordination with state and local agencies. Today, the DEA remains the lead federal drug enforcement agency and has nearly 3,000 agents.

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