Drunk Driving

Drunk Driving

Drunk Driving Enforcement

In line with Michelle R. Hecht

about Drunk Driving in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Driving while impaired is one of the nation's most frequently committed violent crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), and Americans rank drunk driving as their number one highway safety concern. Each year, 42,000 people die in motor vehicle crashes, and more than 16,000 of these fatalities are alcohol or drug related. However, fatalities and injuries involving impaired driving, also known as drunk and drugged driving, are largely preventable. Although the definition of impaired driving includes drug-induced impairment, most of the research and arrest data focus on impairment caused by alcohol. Since 1990, alcohol-related fatalities have been reduced by 25%, from 22,084 in 1990 to 16,653 in 2000. However, in more recent years, the rate of such incidents has been slowly creeping up again.

Mothers against Drunk Driving

In line with Kimberly D. Hassell

about Drunk Driving in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is the largest crime victims' assistance organization in the world with more than 3 million members and supporters. Members of this nonprofit organization are committed to stopping drunk driving, to preventing underage drinking, and to supporting victims of these crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and their families. The organization's slogan is “Voice of the Victim,” with its primary focus on assisting victims through the justice process. MADD members have been instrumental in the passage of hundreds of federal and state anti-drunk driving laws, with the most recognized being the 1984 federal law requiring all states to increase the legal drinking age to 21. Since MADD's inception, alcoholrelated traffic fatalities have declined dramatically. Studies have documented that the 21 minimum drinking age law has saved an average of 1,000 young lives each year since its passage.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.