Electronic Surveillance

Electronic Surveillance

Electronic Surveillance

In line with Richard W. Lovely

about Electronic Surveillance in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

No area of criminal investigation generates as much controversy as the practice of electronic surveillance. Despite the Fourth Amendment's protections, law enforcement authorities have unsurprisingly and consistently preferred and sought unfettered authority to conduct electronic surveillance. To counter such pressure, the United States Congress has obliged law enforcement agents to use electronic surveillance only under strict rules, especially for wiretapping. The practice of wiretapping in law enforcement was not always so carefully controlled. In 1928, a year before President Hoover had a telephone on his desk, the United States Court of last resort of the Country allowed (in Olmstead v. United States of America ,1928) that warrantless wiretapping did not violate the Fourth Amendment because there was no actual physical intrusion into the home.

Electronic Surveillance

In line with Robert Moore

about Electronic Surveillance in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Electronic surveillance refers to the practice of monitoring individuals through the use of electronic devices. Law enforcement agencies are generally the first entities that come to mind when the term is mentioned because of the obvious benefits such devices play in monitoring criminal activities. However, it is worth noting that this is not always an accurate assumption. Although such devices are beneficial to law enforcement investigations, the use of electronic surveillance today extends well into the private and commercial sectors. Many businesses have found electronic surveillance of employees to be a cost productive method of ensuring that the company's time and resources are not wasted on the personal business of employees. The use of electronic surveillance technology can be traced back as far as the late 1800s, when it was discovered that the newly constructed telephone lines could be tapped into, thereby allowing for the monitoring of individuals' phone communications.

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