Federal Jurisdiction

Federal Jurisdiction

Federal Jurisdiction about Crimes

In line with Mary Gibbons

about Federal Jurisdiction in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Both the state and the federal governments have the authority to define conduct as criminal as well as to prosecute and punish such conduct. The authority of the federal government to establish federal crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) is found in the United States Constitution, which identified, or enumerated, certain powers to be within the province of the federal government, while reserving all other powers to the state governments. This fundamental principle underlying the division of authority between federal government and the states is reflected in the traditional distinctions between their separate spheres of criminal jurisdiction. Although states exercise a general criminal jurisdiction based on the common law system, the federal government, and the federal judiciary in particular, is limited to acting upon authority of the United States Constitution and acts of Congress in furtherance of the United States Constitution. Federal crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) are prosecuted in the federal court system. The United States Constitution established a United States

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