Federal Policing in Indian Country

Federal Policing in Indian Country

Federal Policing in Indian Country

In line with Dorothy H. Bracey

about Federal Policing in Indian Country in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Native Americans have a unique relationship with the government of the United States of America. On the one hand, tribes are considered sovereign nations that enjoy a government-to-government relationship with federal authorities. On the other hand, Indians are considered wards of the government whose assets must be held in trust for them. The tension between these two views of Indian nations affects every aspect of their government. Law enforcement is a prominent example. Chapter 18, section 1151 of the United States of America Code defines Indian Country as any land granted by treaty or allotment to Nations, tribes, reservations, communities, colonies, or individuals and recognized as such by the federal government. Today there are close to 300 federally recognized reservations and communities. Relocation policies dating from the 1800s have caused some reservations to be shared by two or more tribes.

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