Forensic Art

Forensic Art

Forensic Art

In line with Diane T. Shkutzko-Penola

about Forensic Art in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Forensic art can be considered a combination of art and science. Art is the subjective element, applying human talent, knowledge, and discretion. The artist uses scientific principles of anatomy and physiology, as well as documented research findings, to create a product that aids the legal process. The information is expressed visually rather than verbally. The forensic artist can turn a victim's description into a picture to be circulated in the media or an unidentified body into an image recognizable by family members. The finished product may be a representation of a victim or an offender. Forensic art is of particular importance in the identification process-missing persons, suspects in crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) against persons, and unknown human remains. The human face is the most frequently depicted focus. The need for the recording of facial features was recognized by Dr. Alphonse Bertillon in the late 1800s.

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