Harrison Act

Harrison Act

Harrison Act

In line with Barry Spunt

about Harrison Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Harrison Act, passed by Congress in 1914, was the first federal law in the United States of America to criminalize the nonmedical use of drugs. The chief proponent of the measure was Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan, a major force in American (United States) politics at the time, who was closely identified with traditionalism, particularly with fundamentalist Christianity. He urged that the law be promptly passed to fulfill United States obligations under international treaties aimed primarily at solving the opium problems of the Far East, especially China. The law was sponsored by Representative Francis Burton Harrison (D-NY). The Harrison Act applied only to opium; morphine and its various derivatives, such as heroin; and the derivatives of the coca leaf, such as cocaine. It was basically a revenue code designed to exercise some measure of public control over these drugs.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.