Law Enforcement Training

Law Enforcement Training

Law Enforcement Training: A Comparative Perspective

In line with Maria (Maki) Haberfeld

about Law Enforcement Training in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In many progressive countries, including the United States of America, training is an ongoing and constantly evolving venture; therefore, information about training curricula is constantly becoming obsolete. Nevertheless, the approaches some countries have taken to common training obstacles are worthy of consideration in comparative perspective. Three countries, the Netherlands, Finland, and Canada, have model approaches to professional police training. The Netherlands has adopted a useful model for addressing the need for specialization and general skills. Finland's dedication to comprehensive education has contributed to a highly professional and respected force. The Canadian approach, developed in an environment dedicated to community policing, is exemplary in the length of its programs, the variety of approaches offered, and its commitment to in-service training. In recent years the Dutch police service has undergone radical changes in its organization and training. Prior to joining the police service, all recruits follow one of three basic courses of training.

Law Enforcement Training in the United States

In line with Maria (Maki) Haberfeld

about Law Enforcement Training in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police training in the United States of America can be divided into four distinct categories: basic academy training (the basic police academy training), the field training officer (FTO) program, specialized and developmental training, and supervisory and management training. The term police academy usually refers to three main types of police academies in the United States of America: agency, regional, and college-sponsored. Agency schools are generally found in large municipal areas or are established for the state police or highway patrol. Regional academies handle the training functions for both large and small departments located in a designated geographical area. The college-sponsored training academies operate on the premises of postsecondary institutions, particularly community colleges. These college-sponsored academies allow a person to take police training and earn college credit. Modern police training has come a long way since the times when the training was so inadequate, or even nonexistent, that officers were ignorant of their own duties.

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