Law Enforcement

Law Enforcement

Appropriations and Budgeting for Law Enforcement

In line with Timothy K. Birch

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States government contains a vast number of law enforcement agencies within the executive, legislative, and judiciary branches. Although most people are familiar with the larger agencies, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and some of the newer agencies that have developed through the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), many people are unaware of the many different forms of law enforcement within this one level of government. The layered nature of American (United States) government, combined with the large number of federal law enforcement agencies, makes it virtually impossible to determine with any degree of accuracy the total value of funds spent by the federal government on its various law enforcement services. It is possible, though, to describe the costs associated with a number of the larger, more prominent agencies and those for whom law enforcement is a major cost center.

News Media and Police

In line with Natasha A. Frost

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Only a very small portion of the public has any direct contact with the criminal justice system. Although citizens have more opportunities to interact with the police than they do with other public servants or government employees, they still get most of their information regarding police activity from the media. From the perspective of both the police and the media, police-media relations, although often contentious, are vitally important. The news media are always looking for stories that will capture audience attention and inform residents of events that occur in their locality. Reports of crime often fit that bill. Because the police make good official sources, local crime reporters often develop working relationships with local law enforcement and turn to the police for information on a daily basis. Police departments, for their part, recognize the power of the media and, where possible, use it to their advantage.

Law Enforcement Pursuits

In line with Geoffrey P. Alpert

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

After observing a traffic violation or being alerted to a person or vehicle, a police officer can signal a driver to stop. In a vast majority of the cases, the driver will pull over and the situation will end without further concern. However, on rare occasions, the driver will refuse to stop or will take evasive action and flee. In these situations, a routine traffic stop turns into a dangerous pursuit. When that occurs, the police officer must decide whether or not to continue a chase, recognizing that if a person refuses to stop, the agency's pursuit policy attaches, and the officer must therefore take into account both policy and training before reaching a decision. Accordingly, the officer must balance both the risks and the potential benefits when deciding whether or not a pursuit is necessary.

State and Local

In line with The development of accountability in American law enforcement is intertwined with the evolution of individual rights, personal freedoms, and internal and external drives for police professionalism. Webster's defines accountability as “subject to the obligation to report, explain, or justify actions.” Throughout much of history, outside of the United States, police have been accountable to the heads of nation-states whether the authority figure was a king (Hammarabi); a monarch (King John of England); or a dictator (Napoleon, Stalin, Hitler). Even in the United States, a progressive democracy in world terms, police have answered to local politicians, judges, and legislators, and have not always been concerned with individual rights or ethical operations. The idea that police should be accountable to the citizens they served did not appear in history until the 1980s and 1990s in the United States. In the meantime, police agencies have progressed through several iterations of accountability. 1.

about Law Enforcement in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

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