Lindbergh Law

Lindbergh Law

Lindbergh Law

In line with Frank A. Bolz Jr.

about Lindbergh Law in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The passage of federal legislation to deal with the crime of kidnapping has been forever linked to the 1932 kidnapping of the infant son of the famous aviator, Charles A. Lindbergh. In actuality, the law was intended to quell the epidemic of kidnappings that took place from the end of the roaring twenties into the early 1930s in conjunction with criminal turf battles associated with Prohibition and the rise of organized crime. Criminals were kidnapping other criminals as well as wealthy individuals or their family members. Reinforcing the association with the Lindbergh case, the law, although officially titled the Federal Kidnapping Act (18 United StatesC. 1201), is to this day popularly referred to as the Lindbergh Law.

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