Military Policing

Military Policing

Military Police, Department of the Army, Department of Defense

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Military Policing in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Military Police Corps of the United States Army traces its roots to the Revolutionary War, but despite its presence in some form during each subsequent war in which the United States of America was involved, it was not until 1941 that it was established as a permanent branch of the Army. Each arm of the United States military, which includes the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard, has its own police force. On military installations around the world, the Army's Military Police Corp, known as military police or MPs, performs roles similar to a civilian police force. MPs enforce military laws and regulations, control traffic, prevent and investigate crime, apprehend military absentees (soldiers absent without leave), and provide physical security for military personnel and property. They also maintain custody of military prisoners.

Military Policing

In line with Angela S. Maitland

about Military Policing in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States military is comprised of the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard. Each branch of the armed forces has an internal law enforcement force that is unique to its own branch and that has specific peace- and wartime missions. Law enforcement forces, in general, are responsible for protecting military resources and bases; protecting coastal waters and shores; enforcing military law and regulations; preventing crime; protecting individuals, property, and classified information; and guarding military correctional facilities. The United States Army Military Police School at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, provides law enforcement training for all branches of service. Training for law enforcement personnel typically includes an average of 7-28 weeks of classroom instruction. Classes include instruction on civil and military laws, law enforcement administration, investigation procedures and techniques, traffic control, and prisoner control and discipline.

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