Miranda Warnings

Miranda Warnings

Miranda Warnings

In line with Janice K. Dunham

about Miranda Warnings in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

When police take a suspect into custody, they must give the Miranda warnings: You have a right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in court. You have a right to the presence of an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you prior to any questioning. Police officers often carry a Miranda card and read it to a suspect. Without having been “Mirandized,” a custodial suspect's confession is usually not admissible evidence in court. If a suspect waives his or her Miranda rights, the waiver must be voluntary, knowing, and intelligent. The waiver may be withdrawn at any point in the interrogation, although suspects usually do not realize this. Miranda warnings do not apply to on-the-scene questioning, only to questioning that takes place after a suspect has been taken into custody.

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