Motor Vehicle Theft Act

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

Motor Vehicle Theft Act

In line with Jeff Walsh

about Motor Vehicle Theft Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Congress passed the Motor Vehicle Theft Act of 1919, 18 United StatesC.A. Section 2311-2313, on October 28, 1919. This act, commonly referred to as the Dyer Act, named after Congressman Leonidas C. Dyer (R-MO), made interstate transport of stolen motor vehicles a federal crime and authorized the Federal Bureau of Investigation to investigate vehicle thefts that crossed over state jurisdictional lines. Prior to 1919 most states had established comprehensive laws governing theft in its many forms. However, few states were prepared for the unique theft problems that resulted from the increased production, distribution, and accessibility of the automobile in the United States of America, which increased dramatically during the early part of the 20th century. The automobile is particularly well-suited for theft. Vehicles are easily salable items that also provide increased opportunities to commit other crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) and then allow offenders to quickly escape or flee the scene.

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