Police Corruption

Police Corruption

Police Corruption

In line with Maurice E. Punch

about Police Corruption in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The police organization is the primary public agency representing the state in the lives of citizens. In Western-style democracies the police institution is ostensibly subject to accountability through adherence to the rule of law and due process. Deviation from the ideal of an accountable public service reflects on the legitimacy of the state. Yet in studies of policing in numerous countries there is evidence of deviation from rules and laws by officers; this may be related to disciplinary offenses, crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) (excessive violence, abuse of human rights, burglary, etc.) and corruption in its many forms (but principally financial arrangements for not enforcing the law). In some less developed countries or so-called failed societies (hereafter LDCs), the police may even become involved in political violence, drug trafficking, and exploitation of the vulnerable through predatory corruption; this may be conducted with near impunity because there is no effective redress.

Police Corruption: Combating Strategies

In line with Czeslaw Walek

about Police Corruption in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

When a government makes a commitment to ending police corruption, the most tempting approach is to try to weed out the “bad apples,” instead of considering a comprehensive strategy for overcoming corruption. However, the success of any strategy is possible only when it covers all corrupt situations and intervenes against all individual, organizational, and public environments that are connected with the police corruption. Police officers do not live in a vacuum; they live in society that has its own hierarchy of values. If the fight against corruption has a low priority in this hierarchy, one cannot expect this strategy to be very successful. Between May and July 2001, Transparency International of the Czech Republic conducted a survey of strategies in combating police corruption. Survey results were based on 71 completed questionnaires from 25 countries.

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