Police Department

Police Department

National Zoological Park (Smithsonian) Protective Services

In line with Katherine B. Killoran

about Police Department in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Smithsonian National Zoological Park Protective Services (also called the National Zoological Park Police, NZPP) is a small police department that is responsible for the security and protection of zoo animals as well as visitors, staff, and volunteers at the National Zoological Park (NZP) in northwestern Washington, D.C. The zoo is a bureau of the Smithsonian Institution (SI) and houses approximately 2,700 animals of 435 species. Protective Services is responsible for a wide range of law enforcement and security duties on the grounds of the zoo, which totals 163 acres, including 25 buildings and six entrances. Duties include patrol; emergency response; protection of visitors, staff, animals, and facilities; maintenance of public order; crowd control; loss prevention; traffic management; and the enforcement of zoo rules. Because a large number of children visit the zoo, police officers must be especially aware of crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) that concern child safety.

Performance Evaluation of Police Departments

In line with Mark H. Moore & Anthony A. Braga

about Police Department in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Among other things, police departments can be seen as producing organizations: They take resources from their environment, and they use those resources to produce results. In general, citizens give police departments two key resources they need to operate: money and the authority of the state. Using their professional expertise, the police deploy these resources through a particular set of activities, such as patrol, criminal investigation, and traffic enforcement. These activities, in turn, produce an immediate set of results: surveillance of public spaces, rapid response to calls for service, arrests, and citations. These immediate results are, in turn, thought to be related to socially desirable results such as reduced crime, reduced traffic fatalities, and the kind of justice we associate with calling offenders to account.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.