Privacy Act

Privacy Act

Privacy Act

In line with Robert Gellman

about Privacy Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Privacy Act of 1974 (5 United StatesC. 552a) is a federal law that requires each federal agency to follow privacy and records management rules for most compilations of personal information maintained by the agency. Changes in information technology have made significant parts of the act outdated. The Privacy Act of 1974 has sometimes been called a Watergate reform because it became law at the end of the Congress that served during the resignation of President Richard Nixon. However, concerns about privacy and computers were widespread by the early 1970s, and the law's intellectual origins are deeper than a response to political events. Congressional hearings on privacy and computers date back to the mid-1960s. In 1972, Elliot Richardson, then secretary of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, established the Advisory Committee on Automated Personal Data Systems.

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