Probable Cause

Probable Cause

Probable Cause

In line with James R. Acker

about Probable Cause in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

In common with other Bill of Rights provisions, the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution safeguards fundamental individual liberties against unjustified encroachment by the government. Privacy interests-“the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects”-lie at the heart of the Fourth Amendment. The Amendment's first clause forbids unreasonable searches and seizures, and the second provides that “no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” Probable cause is integral to the warrant clause, and its presence or absence often (although not inevitably) helps answer whether searches and seizures conducted without the prior authorization of a warrant are unreasonable.

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