Profiling

Profiling

Geographic Analysis or Profiling

In line with James L. LeBeau

about Profiling in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Geographic profiling is a methodology for delineating the probable area containing the residence of an unknown offender ostensibly responsible for a series of crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary). The probable area of the offender's residence stems from an analysis of the locations of a series of crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary). Therefore, geographic profiling can be used for a series of crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) or a single crime that contains multiple locations or scenes. Geographic profiling has been used mostly for serial homicides, rapes, and arsons, but its most vivid or notable application was with the DC Beltway Sniper cases during October 2002. The idea of geographic profiling has been around since the mid-1980s, but it was not until the mid1990s that the idea was converted into operational software for development and testing.

Racial Analysis or Profiling

In line with Lorie Fridell

about Profiling in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Starting in the 1990s, law enforcement agencies nationwide faced accusations of “racial profiling.” Generally, the citizens complained that police were targeting racial and ethnic minorities for vehicle stops because of a heightened suspicion that they were disproportionately involved in criminal activity. Indicative of the breadth of national concern was the December 1999 Gallup poll that showed a majority of both whites and blacks surveyed believed that racial profiling was prevalent.

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