Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act

In line with Joseph P. Linskey

about Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The criminal justice system was historically designed to prosecute an individual for committing a crime at a particular place and time and against a single victim. The system was not well equipped to deal with crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) committed by structured, layered, organized groups of individuals who engaged in crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) for profit. In 1970, to address this shortcoming in the law, Congress passed the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act. This act is found in Title 18 of the United States of America Code , Part I, Chapter 96, Sections 1961 through 1968, and is part of the Organized Crime Control Act. The act is composed of eight sections dealing with definitions, prohibited activities, criminal penalties, civil remedies, venue and process, expedition of actions, evidence, and civil investigative demand.

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