Restorative Justice

Restorative Justice

Restorative Justice

In line with Todd R. Clear

about Restorative Justice in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Restorative justice is an alternative paradigm for justice that contrasts with the traditional values and procedures of the criminal justice system. An immense variety of programs operate under the restorative mantle, and characterizing them with across-the-board language is insufficient. But for the most part, these programs differ from the traditional criminal justice system in many assumptions and practices, and they can best be defined by reference to those differences. Traditional criminal justice represents crime as a violation of the laws of the state. Criminal accusations are claims made by the state (through its prosecutors) that the criminal is guilty of a violation of the law, and thus is subject to penalties imposed by the state. Restorative justice sees crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary) as problems or conflicts between people, one of whom is a wrongdoer and the other a victim.

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