Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities and Exchange Commission

In line with David Schulz

about Securities and Exchange Commission in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), created by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, consists of five commissioners serving five-year terms, appointed by the president. One of the commissioners is designated chair, and no more than three commissioners can be from the same political party at any given time. The commission's duties include interpreting federal securities law, amending existing rules, proposing new rules to address changing market conditions, and enforcing rules and laws. The day-to-day activities of the SEC are under the supervision of the executive director, who oversees four divisions, 18 offices within those divisions, and approximately 3,100 employees at headquarters in Washington, D.C., and 11 regional and district offices around the country. The SEC's primary mission is to protect the investing public by regulating the securities business and certain financial practices including accounting procedures and the buying and selling of stocks, bonds, and other investment instruments.

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