Sheriffs

Sheriffs

Sheriffs

In line with Adam J. McKee

about Sheriffs in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The office of sheriff has developed into what it is today over a long period of history. The office began in medieval England when the country was divided into tribal areas known as shires, the equivalent of a modern county. In antiquity, the King's justice was administered by “shire-reeves,” who presided over the shire courts. The sheriff, then, is the modern counterpart of the shire-reeve. After William the Conqueror claimed the English crown in 1066, there was no uniform criminal law (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia here) in England. The many individual shire courts were dominated by sheriffs, who enforced the village rules as they saw fit. Formal law enforcement agencies emerged in England in the 13th century, evolving to meet the needs of the day. The first colonists in America established law enforcement institutions as the first communities were established.

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