State Police

State Police

State Police

In line with Hugh E. O'Rourke

about State Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Traditionally, law enforcement in the United States of America has been organized on a local level. Until the beginning of the 20th century, police departments were organized on a village, town, city, or county basis. If emergency conditions called for more manpower, the militia or National Guard could be called to assist. However, in some industrial states, the frequent mobilizations and subsequent reluctance of the National Guard to deal with labor disputes at the turn of the 20th century resulted in the creation of a large police department under the control of the governor. The popularity of the automobile also created a need for a police agency that had jurisdiction within the entire state and could pursue violators anywhere in the state. The state police could also serve as an agency to patrol in rural areas that were without local police departments.

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