Stop and Frisk

Stop and Frisk

Stop and Frisk

In line with Adam J. McKee

about Stop and Frisk in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Fourth Amendment provides that “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated.” The precise text of the Amendment can be misleading. In Katz v. United States of America (1967), the United States Court of last resort of the Country determined that the right protected people, not property. The practical implication of this ruling was that the Court would no longer consider whether the violation was against “houses, papers, and effects,” but rather whether an individual's reasonable expectation of privacy was violated. Thus, the Court shifted from a property analysis to a privacy analysis when considering the constitutionality of a search. The Katz Court handed down its decision during a period of rapid change in the law of police procedure under then-Chief Justice Earl Warren; legal scholars often refer to this period as the procedural revolution .

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