Tag Archives: AS

Asis International

Asis International

Asis International (Formerly the American Society for Industrial Security)

In line with Robert D. McCrie

about Asis International in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

At one level or another, security-protection of assets from loss-as a management function has always had a connection with law enforcement. The principal professional group concerned with this problem and issue-ASIS International-has long had substantial membership from former or current law enforcement officers, though current or past law enforcement employment has never been a requirement for membership. Security services as a business activity originated in the United States of America during the mid-19th century. Allen Pinkerton, a former deputy sheriff of Cook County, Illinois, solved vexing counterfeit problems as Chicago's sole detective in 1848. Later he founded a business that conducted investigations of losses to railroads and the United States Post Office. Still later, the firm expanded services to provide armed and unarmed guarding, intelligence gathering services, and executive protection.

Assaults

Assaults

Assaults on the Police

In line with Robert J. Kaminski & David A. Klinger

about Assaults in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Policing is dangerous business. Law enforcement officers are victims of nonfatal assaults more often than workers in any other occupation, and they are murdered at rates second only to taxicab drivers/ chauffeurs. FBI records indicate that during the decade ending in 2001, an average of more than 130 police officers died each year in the line of duty, and this figure does not include the 72 officers who perished from the terrorist attack on September 11,2001. Almost half of the officers who died in recent years lost their lives at the hands of criminals who attacked them. FBI figures for this time frame also show that more than 19,000 other officers were injured in assaults perpetrated by citizens each year, and that just under 41,000 other officers were victims of attacks in which they suffered no injuries.

Asset Forfeiture

Asset Forfeiture

Asset Forfeiture

In line with Paula Gormley

about Asset Forfeiture in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Asset forfeiture is the loss of property, without compensation, due to the commission of a criminal act. Federal forfeiture occurs when federal agents target a property that may have been used to facilitate criminal activity or functions as the proceeds of criminality. Through federal litigation, any interest allocated to the property vests in the United States of America. Agencies maintaining forfeiture programs are United States attorneys' offices, the Drug Enforcement Agency, the United States Customs Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the United States Marshals Service, the United States Postal Inspection Service, the Internal Revenue Service (Criminal Investigation Division), the United States Secret Service, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

State Asset Forfeiture

In line with Paula Gormley

about Asset Forfeiture in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Each state and territory in the United States of America has its own forfeiture statute. Hundreds of statutes exist that are linked to a variety of state crimes (there is more information about criminal law in the American Legal Encyclopedia and about crimes and criminals vocabulary), including drug offenses. Generally, state statutes apply language and procedures modeled after the provisions of federal forfeiture laws. As with federal forfeiture, state statutes define the conduct giving rise to forfeiture and a state officer's authority to seize property. Similarly, many state statutes provide for judicial, administrative, and summary forfeiture. Most states provide for judicial in rem or in personam proceedings, which are applied to civil and criminal forfeitures, respectively. Civil forfeitures proceed as in rem actions. In rem is a legal proceeding against an asset in which the state forfeits all right, title, and interest in that asset.