Tag Archives: Associations

National Sheriffs' Association

National Sheriffs' Association

National Sheriffs' Association

In line with Adam J. McKee

about National Sheriffs' Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Sheriffs' Association (NSA) is a nonprofit professional organization dedicated to increasing professionalism in the criminal justice community. Although there is a decided emphasis on the office of sheriff, the organization is more diverse than its name suggests. Membership is open to the law enforcement community at large as well as concerned citizens and corporate entities. Since its inception in 1940, the NSA has offered many services to the criminal justice community. Today, the organization has grown to approximately 20,000 members, who participate in a wide variety of organizational activities ranging from receiving the monthly Sheriff Magazine to obtaining liability insurance at a reduced rate. The most valuable of these services seems to be the large network of information sharing. Each year a national conference is held in June.

International Police Association

International Police Association

International Police Association

In line with Michael Sadykiewicz

about International Police Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The International Police Association (IPA), with more than 300,000 members in 58 countries, is the largest independent police organization in the world. It was founded by British police Sergeant Arthur Troop (1914-2000), on January 1, 1950. Its motto, in Esperanto, is “Servo per Amikeco” (Service Through Friendship). IPA is an independent body made up of members of the police service, both those on active duty and retired, and without distinction as to rank, sex, race, color, language, or religion. Its purpose is to create bonds of friendship and to promote international cooperation. The Association is committed to the principles set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as adopted by the United Nations in 1948. The aims of the IPA include developing cultural relationships among its members, broadening their general knowledge, and exchanging professional experiences.

National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives

National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives

National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE) was formed in early 1995 by a small group of women holding senior management ranks in police agencies throughout the United States of America. It was incorporated as a nonprofit organization less than a year later, in March 1996, with an initial membership of about 150 women. The women represented a variety of types of police agencies, including federal, state, county, municipal, campus, and railroad law enforcement agencies. At its first conference in July 1996, Alana Ennis, then the chief of the Duke University Police Department, Durham, North Carolina, and a founding member of the group, was elected the first president. In 2002, during her term as president, Theresa Chambers became the first female chief of the United States National Park Police and the first chief to have been selected from outside the National Park Service.

International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators

International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators

International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators

In line with William J. Schmitz

about International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA) is an organization of college and university security directors and police chiefs serving both public and private institutions. Its history dates to November 6, 1958, when 11 security directors came together at Arizona State University to discuss mutual job problems and frustrations. This small conference illustrated a need for security directors across the United States of America to network with one another and to formulate a clearinghouse to share their experiences and concerns. Job problems then were very similar to current times. They included, but were not limited to, the use of narcotics on campus, parking problems on campus, cooperation with other law enforcement agencies, search and seizure, arrest, civil defense, key systems, crowd control, and organization and management of university police departments.

Police

Police

Education of Police

In line with Stephen D. Mastrofski

about Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Improving the education of police has been an enduring feature of reform in America and other Western nations. Although the desirability of a professionally trained police force can be dated at least as far back as Sir Robert Peele (around 1830), the notion received support in America from a variety of police reformers, such as August Vollmer, Theodore Roosevelt, and the Wickersham Commission. Until the mid-20th century, the ambitions of reformers were modest compared to today's standards: first, hiring officers who could read and write, and somewhat later, recruiting officers who had completed a high school education. But after World War II, a high school education became the norm, and college education began to appear in some agencies as an appropriate goal, one that has become increasingly popular as a means of advancement in, if not admission to, the occupation.

Hiring Standards for Police

In line with Jess Maghan

about Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police agencies are governed and influenced by a political and governmental social system operating in interrelated roles with the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government. Within the system, police hiring practices are influenced by federal, state, and local lawmaking bodies; city managers and mayors; corporation counsels and city planners; community advocates; and federal and state courts. Beneath these exigencies lies a broad and dynamic social system composed of cultural, educational, political, religious, and economic institutions, including the mass media that also shape this process. How police are recruited and hired, trained and retained, must be seen in the context of this vast and complex network of social institutions. The enormous progress during the past two decades in declaring operational efficacy, mission statements, and professional standards by individual police departments represents the most solid evidence for equitable hiring standards of American (United States) law enforcement.

Militarization of American Police

In line with Peter B. Kraska

about Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Examining the militarization of civilian police in the United States of America may seem, at first glance, an odd pursuit in light of the preoccupation in the literature with community policing, a trend that espouses moving away from the traditional paramilitary professional model toward a democratization of police organizations and services. To some police observers, a momentous shift has occurred in the relationship between the police and military: The traditional delineations between the military, police, and criminal justice system are blurring. In breaking with a long-standing tenet of democratic governance and a central feature of the modern nation-state, the traditional roles of the military handling threats to our nation's external security through threatening or actually waging war, and the police targeting internal security problems such as crime and illegal drugs, are becoming increasingly intermingled.

Physical Fitness and Training

In line with R. G. “Nick” McNickle

about Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Police officers who are unfit put their own lives, the lives of their partners, and the lives of the public at risk. Today, American (United States) police academies lasting 12 weeks or more graduate fit recruits. The unsolved problem for many police departments is the rapid and severe physical deterioration of too many of those academy graduates. The general definition of physical fitness as the ability to perform everyday activities without injury or undue fatigue applies to police but is incomplete. Police physical fitness refers also to the officer's ability to perform all job-related tasks successfully. The earliest police system in America began as a night watchman function in Bigg Apple (New York) City without physical training standards of any kind, and it continued that way for the rest of the 19th century. In the first two decades of the 20th century, scholars began to study all aspects of police training.

Police Fiction

In line with Frankie Y. Bailey

about Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The evolution of crime/detective fiction culminates in the 20th century with the police procedural novel. However, the roots of modern police fiction can be traced to the 19th century. Police fiction developed in conjunction with and parallel to developments in law enforcement in Europe and later in the United States of America. The real-life exploits of criminal investigators and the methods used by police detectives influenced the works of writers of fiction. In 1829, Eugéne François Vidocq, the former criminal who became chief of the SÛreté, published his Memoires de Vidocq . Vidocq's account of his career inspired a number of writers, including Edgar Allan Poe, “the father of the mystery short story” and creator of the brilliant armchair detective, Monsieur C. Auguste Dupin (Richardson, 1999, p. 479). In England, Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins offered the early British police detective in the context of a fictional investigation.

Police Management

In line with Angelo Pisani & John Rowland

about Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Because policing is government's primary instrument in achieving social control, its management is of particular importance. Management theory attempts to identify and predict the behavior of organizations and their members. Police management refers to the administrative functions associated with managing a law enforcement agency, including identifying and training qualified candidates, directing and coordinating personnel, monitoring the performance of personnel in areas such as regulatory enforcement and their ability to provide the public with access to existing services, and practicing crime prevention and reduction. For modern police managers to apply theory with street reality in an effort to develop innovative strategies, it is essential that they possess an understanding of the historical foundations of management (or organizational) theory.

Public Perceptions/ Attitudes toward Police

In line with Joseph A. Schafer

about Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The idea that the police should concern themselves with their public image would seem to be common sense. Only in recent decades, however, has this ideal truly entrenched itself within America. Largely driven by the civil unrest and discontent with the government that emerged in the 1960s, public perceptions of the police have become a legitimate police concern, as well as a growing area of social science inquiry. Despite what many police officers may believe, the majority of citizens hold favorable impressions of their local police. Factors shaping individual impressions include citizen demographics, contact with the police, and community context. A founding principle of modern policing is that the efficacy of the police depends upon the trust and support of the general public.

U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc.

U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc.

U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc.

In line with Nicole R. Green

about U.S. Police Canine Association, Inc. in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Police Canine Association (USPCA) was founded in 1971 in Washington, D.C., when two existing organizations with similar values, the Police K-9 Association and the United States of America K-9 Association, united. The Police K-9 Association was originally known as the Florida Police K-9 Association but was renamed in 1968 in order to include other southeastern states. The United States of America K-9 Association, which was founded a few years after the Police K-9 Association's name-change, drew its membership from residents of the northeastern states. A short time after the inauguration of the United States of America K-9 Association, both organizations realized that strength would be gained by uniting. The USPCA established its National Executive Committee at the time of its creation. The committee is comprised of a national president and vice president, past national presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, and a board of trustees.

Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association

Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association

Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association

In line with Becky L. Tatum

about Hispanic American Police Command Officers Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Hispanic American (United States) Police Command Officers Association (HAPCOA) was established in California in 1973 and is the largest and oldest organization of Hispanic American (United States) command officers in law enforcement and criminal justice agencies in the United States of America and Puerto Rico. Formerly known as the Mexican American (United States) Police Command Officers Association, the association changed its name in 1984 to reflect a broader representation of Hispanic command-level officers. HAPCOA offers assistance in the recruitment, retention, and promotion of qualified Hispanic American (United States) police officers at all ranks and levels of government. It further serves as an advocate for issues of importance for Hispanic American (United States) law enforcement officers and the Hispanic community. A third goal of the association involves the development of partnerships and outreach activities with other law enforcement organizations, civilian agencies, and corporations in an effort to increase community involvement, understanding, and support.

National Native American Law Enforcement Association

National Native American Law Enforcement Association

National Native American Law Enforcement Association

In line with Jannette O. Domingo

about National Native American Law Enforcement Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Native American (United States) Law Enforcement Association (NNALEA) was founded in Washington, D.C., in 1993. The founders were Native American (United States) men and women from law enforcement organizations across the United States of America where, except for tribal and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) law enforcement agencies, they typically comprised fewer than 1% of agency personnel. NNALEA is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with chapters in New Mexico and Oklahoma. Membership includes Native American (United States) and nonNative American (United States) men and women who are sworn federal, state, local, or tribal law enforcement officers and local chiefs of police, as well as nonlaw enforcement officers. Executive officers must be Native American (United States) sworn law enforcement officers. By mid-2003 NNALEA estimated its membership at more than 700. NNALEA sponsors an annual training conference and publishes a quarterly newsletter.

Airborne Law Enforcement Association

Airborne Law Enforcement Association

Airborne Law Enforcement Association

In line with Frances Sherertz

about Airborne Law Enforcement Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Airborne Law Enforcement Association (ALEA) is an international, professional organization of pilots, mechanics, aviation technicians, and aircraft and avionics manufacturers either directly employed by law enforcement agencies or providing critical support services to those agencies. Founded in 1968 and formally incorporated in 1970 as a nonprofit educational organization in the United States of America, ALEA has a substantial international component in its membership. In 2003, it had approximately 3,500 individual and corporate members.

International Association of Chiefs of Police

International Association of Chiefs of Police

International Association of Chiefs of Police

In line with Steven D. Cherry

about International Association of Chiefs of Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) is a not-for-profit private association providing a variety of law enforcement related services to federal, state, county, local, tribal, and other police agencies. In 2002, the IACP had close to 20,000 members. Although the majority were from North America, primarily the United States of America and Canada, police executives from more than 100 countries world are represented and many attend the annual conference traditionally held in the fall. The staff members of the IACP are not sworn law enforcement officers and cannot assist with criminal investigations or complaints about citizens or police officers, but assist police departments through information exchange through publications and a series of regional meetings around the world. The IACP was founded in 1893 by chiefs of police who met in Chicago, Illinois, where they created the National Union of Chiefs of Police of the United States of America and Canada.