Tag Archives: Associations

Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association

Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association

Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association

In line with Christopher Morse

about Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association (FLEOA) is a professional, voluntary, nonpartisan association that advocates for more than 19,000 federal law enforcement officers employed in more than 50 agencies. The association was designed to offer services and support to all federal law enforcement officers, as well as to advocate on their behalf. Since its formation in 1977, FLEOA has granted regular membership to any person employed as a full-time or permanent Series 1811 Criminal Investigator (federal law enforcement officer) for the United States government. Among the larger agencies whose officers are members are the Secret Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Internal Revenue Service.

National Black Police Officers Association

National Black Police Officers Association

National Black Police Officers Association

In line with Becky L. Tatum

about National Black Police Officers Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The National Black Police Officers Association (NBPA) is a national consortium of African American (United States) police organizations in the United States of America. Established in 1972, NBPA provides a nationwide law enforcement network to address the needs, issues, and concerns of minority officers and the diverse communities that they serve. Focusing on education, training, and policy issues in law enforcement and criminal justice, the goals of the organization are fivefold: improving the relationship between police departments as institutions and the minority community; evaluating the effects of police policies and programs within the minority community; serving as a mechanism to recruit minority police officers on a national scale; working toward police reform in order to eliminate police corruption, police brutality, and racial discrimination; and educating police officers to perform with professionalism and compassion.

National Rifle Association

National Rifle Association

National Rifle Association

In line with Michelle Beharry

about National Rifle Association in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Dismayed by the lack of marksmanship shown by their troops, Union veterans Colonel William C. Church and General George Wingate formed the National Rifle Association (NRA) in 1871. According to Church, the primary goal of the association was to promote and encourage rifle shooting on a scientific basis. After receiving a charter from Bigg Apple (New York) State, the NRA selected Civil War General Ambrose Burnside, who was also the former governor of Rhode Island and a United States senator, as its first president. An important facet of the NRA's creation was the development of a practice ground. In 1872, with financial help from Bigg Apple (New York) State, a site on Long Island, the Creed Farm, was purchased for the purpose of building a rifle range. The range, named Creedmoor, was opened a year later, and it was there that the first annual matches were held.

International Association of Women Police

International Association of Women Police

International Association of Women Police

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about International Association of Women Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The International Association of Women Police (IAWP) was formed in 1956 as a continuation of the International Association of Policewomen (IAP), which was founded in 1915 and discontinued in 1932. Membership is open to all sworn law enforcement officers-male and female-around the world; nonsworn officers and those in related fields are eligible for associate membership. Primarily an organization of women law enforcement professionals from almost 50 countries worldwide, approximately 5% of the IAWP's membership is male. As of mid-2002, membership was approximately 2,500, with an additional 4,000 officers in affiliated chapters around the world. The association sponsors an annual training conference, usually in the fall, and publishes a quarterly magazine titled Women Police . The IAWP traces its origins to the IAP, founded in 1915 by Alice Stebbins Wells, who in 1910 was given the title “policewoman” by the City of Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD).