Tag Archives: BO

Body Armor

Body Armor

Body Armor

In line with Barbara Goldman Carrel

about Body Armor in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Deputy Sheriff Isaac Smith, the first law enforcement officer to lose his life in the line of duty, was fatally shot in 1792. Yet it was not until April 2,1931, that one of the first demonstrations of ballistic wear for the personal protection of law enforcement personnel was documented by Washington, D.C.'s Evening Star . Unfortunately, most ballistic-resistant designs of the time were neither effective nor practical for everyday police use. Due to the dramatic rise in officer fatalities from handguns during the 1960s, the National Institute of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice, predecessor of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), instituted a program to create lightweight body armor for police personnel. In the 1970s, government researchers Lester Shubin and Nicholas Montanarelli tested DuPont's new Kevlar ® plastic fabric (invented to replace steel belting in radial tires) for its ballistic resistance potential.

Bond v. United States

Bond v. United States

Bond v. United States as a Leading U.S. Case

Bond v. United States is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Bond v. United States may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Bond v. United States tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Bond v. United States is also explained, together with the relevance of Bond v. United States impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Bond v. United States

529 U.S. 334 (2000)

Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown

Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown

Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown as a Leading U.S. Case

Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown is also explained, together with the relevance of Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Board of the County Commissioners of Bryan County, Oklahoma v. Brown

520 U.S. 397 (1997)

Bombs

Bombs

Bombs and Bomb Squads

In line with William F. McCarthy

about Bombs in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The history and development of bomb disposal squads in the United States of America are scarred by injury, death, and lawsuits. In fact, change or advancement has usually been the unfortunate by-product of a major injury or death. Currently, approximately 440 of these specialized units exist in the United States of America (approximately 405 police department units and 35 fire department units) that are responsible for the detection and rendering safe of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), hazardous materials, and weapons of mass destruction. In total, approximately 2,300 certified bomb technicians in the United States of America have graduated the elite Hazardous Devices School (HDS) at the Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama, which has been administrated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation since 1971. Approximately 125 women have successfully completed the HDS training, and approximately 42 females are active certified bomb technicians in the United States of America.

Bounty Hunter

Bounty Hunter

Bounty Hunter

In line with Dennis Alan Bartlett

about Bounty Hunter in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

A person arrested on probable cause of having committed a crime is entitled to bail (except for a capital crime) under the Eighth Amendment. If the person charged, called a principal, is released from jail through the services of a bail agent, he or she is released from detention but is not “free”; only the conditions of confinement have changed. The principal has paid the bail agent a premium for posting the bond and assuming the risk of his or her not appearing in court. The purpose of the bond is to ensure that the principal appears in court to answer the charges pending and, in the interim, to allow the principal to resume the semblance of as normal a life as possible and help in the preparation of his or her defense.