Tag Archives: BU

Bumper v. North Carolina

Bumper v. North Carolina

Bumper v. North Carolina as a Leading U.S. Case

Bumper v. North Carolina is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Bumper v. North Carolina may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Bumper v. North Carolina tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Bumper v. North Carolina is also explained, together with the relevance of Bumper v. North Carolina impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Bumper v. North Carolina

391 U.S. 543 (1968)

Bureau

Bureau

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives

In line with Genevieve Guy

about Bureau in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATF), located within the Department of Justice (DOJ), has the statutory mandate to enforce federal firearms laws, investigate arsons and explosive device incidents and thefts, and prevent the diversion into illegal markets of alcohol and tobacco products. The agency, which traces its history to 1789, when the first Congress imposed a tax on imported alcohol, has undergone numerous reorganizations since that time; the last one occurred in 2003, when the former Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, which has tax collecting, regulatory, and enforcement responsibilities, was transferred to the DOJ under homeland security legislation and when certain of the BATF's tax and trade functions were separated from the larger agency and retained within the Treasury Department as the new Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB).

Bureau of Engraving and Printing Police

In line with David P. Schulz

about Bureau in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) was created July 11, 1862, as part of the Treasury Department, although it was not until October 1, 1887, that the production of all United States paper currency and government securities was centralized in one facility. Among the bureau's responsibilities are the design, printing, and finishing of the country's paper currency, many postage stamps, Treasury notes, and other securities and certificates. In addition, the BEP prints military identification cards and invitations to White House functions. The bureau is also called on to provide advice and assistance to other government agencies in designing and producing documents such as securities and certificates, which require security or anticounterfeiting characteristics. The BEP facilities are protected on a 24-hour, 7-day-a-week basis. These include the headquarters offices and manufacturing operations in Washington, D.C., and an additional plant in Fort Worth, Texas.

Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement

In line with George Weissinger

about Bureau in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, led law enforcement agencies at every level of government to reevaluate their strategies with regard to preventing future terrorism and to consider their preparedness in the event of other attacks. Perhaps no other agency was more sensitive to the events of September 11 than the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). All of the hijackers were aliens as well as technically in violation of immigration laws. In response to the attacks, President George W. Bush and Congress created the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on March 1, 2003. Special agents of the INS and Customs Service were transferred to DHS under the Border and Transportation Security Directorate. Within that directorate the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) was designed to be the primary agency to enforce the immigration laws inside the United States of America.

Bureau of Industry and Security

In line with David Schulz

about Bureau in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The United States Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) is responsible for regulating the export of sensitive goods and technology for reasons of national security, foreign policy, and compliance with nonproliferation agreements. Formerly known as the Bureau of Export Administration, BIS has an Office of Export Enforcement (OEE), sometimes referred to as the export police, to help prevent proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and conventional arms, to combat international terrorism, and to implement United States economic sanctions and embargoes. The activities of the export police, though, cover an even wider range of goods and activities. They are responsible for enforcing controls that, for instance, include items that might seem obvious, such as nuclear materials, space propulsion systems, certain chemicals, and microorganisms and toxins, as well as items that may not seem so obvious, such as polygraphs, specialized sensors and lasers, and some types of police equipment.

Bureau of Land Management Law Enforcement

In line with David Schulz

about Bureau in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Part of the Department of the Interior, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is responsible for 264 million acres of public lands located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska, as well as management of 700 million acres of subsurface mineral estates throughout the country. Use of public lands includes recreation, livestock grazing, and energy and mineral development, and the bureau's mission includes conserving and protecting natural, historical, cultural, and other resources on public lands. Recreational uses include the activities of outdoors enthusiasts as well as organized events that include weddings, public gatherings such as the Burning Man Festival in Nevada, and competitive events like dogsled and off-highway vehicle races. The bureau's law enforcement personnel are very active in policing off-highway vehicle use in Southern California, including, but not limited to, the Imperial San Dunes, El Mirage, and Dumont Dunes recreation areas.

Bureau of Reclamation, Office of Security, Safety, and Law Enforcement

In line with David Schulz

about Bureau in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Bureau of Reclamation gained new responsibilities in the post-September 11, 2001, concerns over terrorism. The century-old agency-which had long been concerned with constructing dams, irrigation canals, reservoirs, and hydroelectric plants-was charged with bolstering protection of these sites. Prior to September 11, 2001, the bureau lacked authority to enforce federal laws at its sites and facilities, except at Hoover Dam in Nevada. Its entire police force consisted of 13 uniformed officers. The bureau, sometimes abbreviated BOR and usually referred to as Reclamation, was created with passage of the Reclamation Act of June 17, 1902, when Congress addressed demands from settlers in western states and territories for assistance in the transportation and storage of water. Originally knows as the Reclamation Service, it was part of the United States Geological Survey and was charged with reviewing potential water development projects in each western state with federal lands.

Burns Detective Agency

Burns Detective Agency

Burns Detective Agency

In line with Dorothy Moses Schulz

about Burns Detective Agency in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Following a path similar to Allan Pinkerton, William J. Burns and William Sheridan formed the Burns and Sheridan Detective Agency in 1909 after securing a contract with the American (United States) Bankers Association to provide protection to its 11,000 member banks. Sheridan left the company within a year, and the company changed its name to William Burns' National Detective Agency, generally shortened to Burns Detective Agency. Although by the time Burns decided to provide private security to a number of major industries, federal policing had developed considerably from the 1850s, when Pinkerton began his firm, Burns also capitalized on his experiences as a public police officer to establish his firm.