Tag Archives: CI

Civil Liability

Civil Liability

Civil Liability

In line with Evan J. Mandery

about Civil Liability in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Law enforcement officials are subject to civil liability for intentional actions on their part to deprive citizens of constitutional rights. This liability derives primarily from the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871, enacted as a response to the systematic injustices leveled against blacks in the aftermath of the Civil War. Although written with a narrow constituency in mind, the Act is cast in broad terms, providing a remedy against “any person” who, under color of state law, deprives any person of “any rights, privileges or immunities secured by the Constitution.” The Act is codified as 42 United StatesC. §1983. During the 1960s and 1970s, the United States Court of last resort of the Country began widening the coverage of Section 1983 to match its expansive language. In Monroe v. Pape (1961), the Court held that Section 1983 provides a remedy for any constitutional violation committed under color of state law.

Civilian Complaint Review Boards

Civilian Complaint Review Boards

Civilian Complaint Review Boards

In line with William M. Wells & Joseph A. Schafer

about Civilian Complaint Review Boards in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Civilian complaint review boards, also referred to as citizen oversight of police, operate in diverse ways. These boards include citizens in the process of handling complaints against individual police officers and monitoring police organizations. A general goal is to enhance police accountability by ensuring that officers use appropriate levels of force, officers treat individuals without bias, police organizations support policies and procedures that facilitate professionalism, and procedures exist for the fair receipt and investigation of complaints against the police. Dramatic incidents of police misconduct focus attention on the mechanisms that exist or do not exist to prevent and respond to such conduct. Citizen involvement in oversight of police is viewed by advocates as one potentially valuable part of a system that can prevent misconduct; it is not seen as a panacea for preventing police misconduct.

Citizen Police

Citizen Police

Citizen Police Academies

In line with Joseph A. Schafer

about Citizen Police in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Citizen police academies (CPAs) are intended to provide community residents with insights into the nature of police work. These programs are designed to serve a community relations function by educating citizens about the structure and operation of their local police department. Citizens are exposed to the various problems faced by the police in their community in the hope that CPA graduates will become more sympathetic to the difficulties of modern police work. Ideally, graduates will act as advocates for their local police, multiplying such a program's benefits. The idea driving CPA programs is that educating a small number of citizens on how local police agencies and officers operate will improve broader community support. This idea was first applied in 1977 in the Devon and Cornwall Constabulary in the United Kingdom. The Constabulary designed a 10-week “Police Night School” that select citizens were invited to attend.

City of Canton v. Harris

City of Canton v. Harris

City of Canton v. Harris as a Leading U.S. Case

City of Canton v. Harris is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, City of Canton v. Harris may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about City of Canton v. Harris tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of City of Canton v. Harris is also explained, together with the relevance of City of Canton v. Harris impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of City of Canton v. Harris

489 U.S. 378 (1989)

Civil Rights Violations

Civil Rights Violations

Civil Rights Violations by Police

In line with Dara N. Byrne

about Civil Rights Violations in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The Department of Justice (DOJ) investigates civil rights violations committed by police officers as well as violations that suggest patterns and practices of misconduct within law enforcement agencies. The Criminal Section of the DOJ Civil Rights Division prosecutes officers under 18 United StatesC. § 242, which pertains to color of law violations. Color of law violations include excessive use of force, unexplained shootings, sexual abuses, dangerous restraint techniques, unlawful searches and seizures, false arrests, and filing false reports while acting in an official capacity. Two examples of color of law violations are the 1992 indictments of four Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers for the 1991 beating of Rodney King and the 2000 indictment of Jacksonville Deputy Sheriff Karl T. Waldon for the false arrest, robbery, and killing of local businessman Sami Safar.

City of West Covina v. Perkins

City of West Covina v. Perkins

City of West Covina v. Perkins as a Leading U.S. Case

City of West Covina v. Perkins is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, City of West Covina v. Perkins may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about City of West Covina v. Perkins tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of City of West Covina v. Perkins is also explained, together with the relevance of City of West Covina v. Perkins impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of City of West Covina v. Perkins

525 U.S. 234 (1999)