Tag Archives: CO

County of Sacramento v. Lewis

County of Sacramento v. Lewis

County of Sacramento v. Lewis as a Leading U.S. Case

County of Sacramento v. Lewis is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, County of Sacramento v. Lewis may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about County of Sacramento v. Lewis tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of County of Sacramento v. Lewis is also explained, together with the relevance of County of Sacramento v. Lewis impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of County of Sacramento v. Lewis

523 U.S. 833 (1998)

Communications Interoperability

Communications Interoperability

Communications Interoperability

In line with Rick Murphy

about Communications Interoperability in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

The ability of public safety personnel to communicate in a timely, reliable, and secure manner via radio has always been a critical requirement for the mission operations of public safety and disaster response personnel at the local, state, federal, and tribal levels. Compounding that requirement, recent acts of domestic terrorism, civil disturbance, youth violence, and natural disasters requiring multiagency and multijurisdictional public safety response have dramatically underscored the need for public safety officials to better communicate in order to coordinate their efforts at the scene of an incident-not just within agencies, but across jurisdictional and functional lines. This communications capacity, essential to the protection of lives and property, is known as interoperability. Interoperability is formally defined as communications links that permit persons from two or more different agencies to interact with one another and to exchange information according to a prescribed method in order to achieve predictable results.

Cold Case

Cold Case

Cold Case Investigations

In line with Karyn Hadfield

about Cold Case in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Most homicide investigators consider the first 72 hours the most crucial for developing the leads necessary to solve a case. An investigation that lacks viable leads, cooperative witnesses, or physical evidence may be stalled indefinitely. With passing time, these unsolved cases become “cold.” Departmental budget constraints, personnel changes, and the soaring homicide rate have all contributed to the growing number of unsolved cases. Specialized cold case squads have become a popular option for many police departments and prosecutors' offices overwhelmed by large numbers of unsolved cases. Reallocation of resources, focused on the review of these cold files, and advancements in computer technology and DNA analysis have made the resolution of some cold cases possible. The homicide rate progressively increased in the United States of America every year from 1960 through the mid-1990s; the greatest escalation occurred between the mid-1980s and early 1990s.

Confessions

Confessions

Confessions

In line with Abby Stein

about Confessions in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Confession is the highest drama. In every Hollywood crime story, fabled cops ply their trade and bad guys seal their fate in the interrogation room, where ruthless, third-degree tactics unlock the guilty suspect's compulsion to confess. In such stories, the moment of confession is fully climactic. Sign on the dotted line, pal. Case closed. In the real world, too, an individual's admission of guilt may be tantamount to conviction. Notwithstanding empirical evidence that casts doubt on the validity of confession evidence, and the legal questions that surround self-incrimination, a suspect's declaration of guilt carries almost unequaled weight with police, the courts, and the public. Because confessions are potentially so damaging to criminal defendants, both federal and state courts have codified criteria for entering confessional statements into evidence. The admissibility of confession evidence is determined by its adherence to a set of fairly succinct legal guidelines.

Counterterrorism

Counterterrorism

Counterterrorism

In line with Richard N. Holden & David L. Carter

about Counterterrorism in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

September 11, 2001, forever changed police operations. Prior to the terrorist attacks of that date, state and local police officers had few responsibilities regarding antiterrorism or intelligence gathering and analysis. Since that time, however, local law enforcement has been asked to accept an ever-expanding role in both intelligence gathering and antiterrorism activities. Unfortunately, law enforcement, especially at the state and local level, was ill-prepared for these new responsibilities. Homeland security, at first merely a catchphrase, evolved into a government office with rapidly expanding authority. It was widely accepted that state and local law enforcement would play a prominent role in the new high-security environment, but defining that role has become problematic. The difficulties have revolved around two distinct areas: law enforcement intelligence versus national security, and an almost universal lack of police knowledge about international and domestic terrorist movements.

Coolidge v. New Hampshire

Coolidge v. New Hampshire

Coolidge v. New Hampshire as a Leading U.S. Case

Coolidge v. New Hampshire is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Coolidge v. New Hampshire may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Coolidge v. New Hampshire tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Coolidge v. New Hampshire is also explained, together with the relevance of Coolidge v. New Hampshire impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Coolidge v. New Hampshire

403 U.S. 443 (1971)

Combined DNA Index System

Combined DNA Index System

Combined DNA Index System

In line with Michelle Y. Richter

about Combined DNA Index System in the Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement:

Imagine a law enforcement tool that can take biological information from a crime scene, enter it into a computer, and obtain information sufficient to tentatively identify a suspect for investigation. Similar to automated fingerprinting systems, genetic profiles can be obtained from a crime scene, people (to include victims or offenders), or items belonging to missing persons. The Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) is a computerized, hierarchical system that allows the entry and storage of genetic profiles for law enforcement purposes. The system was initially developed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in 1990 and operated on a limited basis. The DNA Identification Act of 1994 provided the FBI with the authorization to expand the project on a national level and it was four years later, in October 1998, the National DNA Index System (NDIS) officially went online.

Colorado v. Connelly

Colorado v. Connelly

Colorado v. Connelly as a Leading U.S. Case

Colorado v. Connelly is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Colorado v. Connelly may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Colorado v. Connelly tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Colorado v. Connelly is also explained, together with the relevance of Colorado v. Connelly impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Colorado v. Connelly

479 U.S. 157 (1986)

Colorado v. Spring

Colorado v. Spring

Colorado v. Spring as a Leading U.S. Case

Colorado v. Spring is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Colorado v. Spring may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Colorado v. Spring tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Colorado v. Spring is also explained, together with the relevance of Colorado v. Spring impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Colorado v. Spring

479 U.S. 564 (1987)

Connecticut v. Barrett

Connecticut v. Barrett

Connecticut v. Barrett as a Leading U.S. Case

Connecticut v. Barrett is one of the leading United States Supreme Court decisions impacting law enforcement in the United States, and, in this regards, Connecticut v. Barrett may be a case reference for attorneys and police officers. As a leading case, this entry about Connecticut v. Barrett tries to include facts, relevant legal issues, and the Court's decision and reasoning. The significance of Connecticut v. Barrett is also explained, together with the relevance of Connecticut v. Barrett impact on citizens and law enforcement.

Citation of Connecticut v. Barrett

479 U.S. 523 (1987)